Stiffening a length of copper pipe

My late wife had made a wonderfully colourful patchwork bedspread, that came out once a year at Christmas. I would like to hang it on a wall, rather like a tapestry, so that it's on view all the time, because I love it.
The bedspread is edged with a double thickness of black fabric. My plan is to unpick the stitching of this edging at each end of one side, so that I can slide a length of 15mm copper pipe* through it. Then I plan to support the copper pipe at each end with curtain pole brackets. (I had thought of using curtain pole instead of copper pipe, but the narrowest available seems to be 28mm, and I think that would be too fat to slide into the bedspread edging strip).
But the bedspread is rather heavy (it's backed with panels of black corduroy and velvet), and I am concerned the pipe will sag in the middle. What can I do to stiffen it? I had thought of filling it with cement, but IIRC cement corrodes copper over time. Another thought was to fill it with loose sand and vibrate it to compact the sand really well, but I'm not sure that would make the pipe rigid enough; yet a third thought was to fill it with expanding foam, but again, would that be effective?
Any other suggestions? The bedspread is 1.65m sq. Picture here https://ibb.co/kZwK2f (in reality, the colours are richer than in the picture).
*it's a length I have spare, but I could get some 22mm pipe if it would be better.
--

Chris

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On 30/10/2018 10:33, Chris Hogg wrote:

Fill it with a steel rod.
Mike
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Threaded at each end so it can be tightened to have a slight bow upwards. Like a guitar truss rod. Of course the mounting brackets would have to be pretty good to stop it rotating.
--
Bill

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On Tuesday, 30 October 2018 10:45:53 UTC, Muddymike wrote:

cement/sand has near zero tensile strength, and without tensile strength will give you no extra rigidity/strength. Go steel or wood.
NT
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On 30/10/18 12:32, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It would prevent the copper from kinking by resisting local crushing - so may actually work.
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On Tuesday, 30 October 2018 16:14:19 UTC, Tim Watts wrote:

fair point. It would also add weight :)
NT
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On Tue, 30 Oct 2018 10:42:28 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I originally had in mind to fill the pipe with dry sand-cement mix, vibrate the tube to compact the mix, stand the pipe on end, duck-tape a funnel to the top, fill with water and let it soak down through to wet the cement.
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Chris

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On 30/10/18 17:44, Chris Hogg wrote:

It would be cheaper to go to B&Q and just buy a bit of steel tube :) And cover with copper tube if you are concerned about rust.
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On 30/10/2018 17:49, Tim Watts wrote:

Chromed wardrobe rail is cheap enough anyway.
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On Wed, 31 Oct 2018 20:37:42 +0000, newshound

Which I've now bought, the oval type, just the right length - doesn't even need cutting.
--

Chris

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On Thu, 1 Nov 2018 19:34:00 +0000 (GMT+00:00), Jim K

I should have also mentioned that I also got a pair of these https://tinyurl.com/yb4q53uc There is some narrow coving, but a small gap between the quilt and the wall is probably no bad thing as it will allow air to circulate. All I have to do now is fix them to the ceiling. With a lot of luck, there'll be joists in the right places, but failing that I'll probably put up a batten. I'm not really happy about just fixing them to the plasterboard.
--

Chris

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On Thu, 1 Nov 2018 22:44:31 +0000 (GMT+00:00), Jim K

7.74kg. 2 brackets, 2 screws each, so say 2kg per screw. Straight pull down from the ceiling. Into plasterboard? I'm not sure I'd be happy with that but I may be wrong. These things perhaps https://tinyurl.com/yd8fdx55 or these https://tinyurl.com/ycj72hzg ? Don't know their loading capability. But I haven't explored exactly where the joists run yet.
--

Chris

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The first are rated around 8 kg load...
Thomas Prufer
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On Fri, 02 Nov 2018 20:17:34 +0100, Thomas Prufer

Useful. Thanks. In that case, I think I'll go in that direction. It's the simplest option, all things considered.
--

Chris

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I have used the metal ones, and they are easy to install, if using a cordless driver thing: PZ bit, apply to wall, screw in, done. Maybe a pinch or three of plaster dust.
Thomas Prufer
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On 30/10/2018 16:14, Tim Watts wrote:

Yup.
But thats adding strength, not stiffness.
I think a carbon fibre tube inside might be fun.
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On 30/10/2018 20:58, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Once of the reasons carbon fibre has come into use for things like golf clubs and boat masts is that it can be made really springy.
Andy
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On 30/10/2018 21:53, Vir Campestris wrote:

One of te reason they make prop shafts out of it is that it can be made really unspringy.
:-)
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On 31/10/2018 10:17, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Odd. If the made it springy they wouldn't need a DMF.
Andy
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On Friday, 2 November 2018 21:48:29 UTC, Vir Campestris wrote:

it would flap uncontrollably.
NT
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