self-closing fire doors in self-catering house?

Some relatives & I went on holiday in a self-catering townhouse in Yorkshire earlier this summer. I think the house was about 10 years old.
All the internal doors except the ones for the bathrooms had self-closing gadgets built in (installed in the frame between the hinges, pulling a chain attached to the hinge side of the door). The visitors' book had several previous comments requesting doorstops because the self-closing doors were a nuisance, followed by a comment from the owners to the effect that they weren't allowed to provide doorstops because of fire regulations.
Comments?
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Adam Funk wrote:

loft conversion, or 3 stories?
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On 2012-09-03, Andy Burns wrote:

3 storeys with no conversion (there was a loft hatch, which I didn't look through, in one of the ceilings upstairs).
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On 03/09/2012 16:27, Adam Funk wrote:

That will be why then... ten years ago self closers on all the doors from habitable rooms onto the main escape route was the norm. The doors however on the lower two storeys did not need to be fire doors.
These days IIUC, self closers are not required, but all the doors from habitable rooms that open onto the primary escape route need to be 30 min fire doors.
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On 2012-09-03, John Rumm wrote:

(Just to be clear, I'm not complaining about the owners --- just curious.)

OK, so they could *now* replace the doors with 30 min fire doors *without* self-closers if they wanted to?
Do these requirements apply to houses intended for single-family owner-occupation, or just rental?
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On 04/09/2012 12:08, Adam Funk wrote:

I believe so. Unless the door was to an integral or attached garage...
For use in a single family dwelling house I think you only need 20 min doors. Not sure about multi.

They do apply to single family occupation, what I don't know is if they get more stringent for rental or houses of multiple occupation.
More here:
http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/uploads/br/AD_B_v1_wm.pdf
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On 2012-09-04, John Rumm wrote:

Interesting, thanks.
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True. We have a self-catering let on three floors that was recently converted (5 years ago) and that was the building reg requirement. Same for our own house. In the let the ground floor door has an electro-magnetic catch to hold it open that is released by the smoke detectors if they go off. Imagine what would happen if there was a fire with fatalities and the owners had been discovered to have provided door stops. The fire doors were the biggest topic of discussion when we were inspected to get our final certificate.
Jonathan
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Adam Funk wrote:

That is correct - and the whole point of a firedoor is to hold-back the spread of a fire for upto an hour.
The legislation on that has been in for quite some time, and I can recall having a contract around the late 90s to fit around 150 internal fire doors and perko springs (excluding the bathrooms and separate toilets) to several blocks of three storey flats (complete with enhanced doorstops and Georgian wired glass).
Cash.
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Surely a proper well adjusted door closer (not spring and chain) would reduce the complaints.
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On 2012-09-03, DerbyBorn wrote:

How? You'd still have to turn the handle, open the kitchen door, grab the oven dish with both hands, rush through the door before it closes on you, knock on the dining room door with your head, wait until someone gets up & opens it, then serve the food.
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what's wrong with having two people take the food from the kitchen to the dining room?
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On Tuesday, September 4, 2012 8:56:59 PM UTC+1, tim..... wrote:

Depends on the house; because of the position of the chimney breast my kitchen door opens into what is effectively a narrow passage - there isn't room for somebody to hold the door open without obstructing the passage.
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On 2012-09-04, tim..... wrote:

That's the other option, of course.
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The owners are quite correct. A fire door is useless if it is wedged open - usually by a fire extinguisher.
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Mr Pounder wrote:

not sure if this is relevant but a LOT of companies have spring loaded fire doors that stay open because a magnet sticks to a bit of material that loses its magnetism at high temps. So they can be left permanently open unless they get hit: Then they close.
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more likely the magnet is an electromagnet which loses its power when then fire alarm goes off. I suspect the High temp ones would be far too late - the door itself could well be on fire by then.
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charles wrote:

that actually depends on what you use. Curie temps can be tailored quite exactly
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On 03/09/2012 18:47, charles wrote:
...

I would be more concerned that it was doing nothing to stop the spread of smoke so long as it stayed open.
Colin Bignell
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On Mon, 03 Sep 2012 18:26:51 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

We have those at work, also some standalone door 'wedges' that release if they hear a fire alarm.
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