round pin plugs



'13 amp' plugs have a fuse in them because the actual circuit is 32 amps. Round pin plugs are meant to be used on a radial circuit where the protection at the CU is correct for the outlet - ie if it's a five amp plug the MCB should be 5 amp too. They're normally used for things like lighting outlets - and lighting circuits are commonly 6 amp radials. If you wish to fit one to a final ring circuit it should be protected by an FCU with suitable fuse.
2 amp three pin are still readily available - TLC have them in most of their ranges. But since they use the same 1 gang size as 5 amp it doesn't make much difference.
--
*A picture may be worth a thousand words, but it uses up a thousand times more
memory.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You can still get them at B&Q - even the smaller branches.
--
Frank Erskine

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stephen wrote:

IIRC the current availability is 5A and 3A, not 2A.
Both are available, but are not fused.
They never were. Their use in lighting circuits coincided with the CU introduction and properly fused spurs..lighting is not normally wired ring, so there is no reason to fuse the CU AND the plug, as all the wires in question can take the full 6A rated current.
i.e. the reason 13A plugs are fused is on account of ring mains: in theory you can e.g. deliver 32A to a ring main socket, which is in excess of the cable rating to the device.
I am not sure what the current use of 3A stuff is. But its probably restricted to switched fused spurs or similar.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, it's 15A, 5A, 2A, as always. (There used to be a 30A too.)

Well, the 2A sockets were used on 5A and 10A circuits.

Nothing to do with ring circuit -- it's because the circuit's fault and/or overload protection is out of scope for the appliance flex, and applies to ring and branch circuits.

I can't imagine what you're referring to.
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

I hadn't realised they had got around to sleeving the pins on them until I saw the TLC illustration.
Can't think why the OP seems to be wanting to go down this route.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Useful for things like table lights on dimmer circuits - if you have them on 13 amp plugs 'someone' may plug in an appliance that overloads the dimmer.
--
*I used to have an open mind but my brains kept falling out *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

On a trip to the US, I was staying in a rented condo. Some electrical appliances semed to only work intermittently.
I traced the fault....
The place was full of dual 110v outlets. Some of these dual outlets ( not all ) had one output fed from the light switch on the wall. The intention was to have lamps around the room come on with the light switch.
This didn't work, because all the lamps were plugged into regular unswitched outputs, and required you to go around switching them all on manually at the lamp ( with the horrible rotaty-rotaty US style lamp switches ). The TV and other things OTOH switched on and off with the 'non-functional' light switch!
After a half-hour with a test lamp, I was able to determine which outlets were switched, and which were not. Re-plugging the appliances to the appropriate sockets, and suddenly everything works as expected. The light switch on the wall now actually brought on the lamps in the room.
There was nothing to distinguish the switched from unswitched outlets, except trial and error.
On subsequent trips, I have come across this often, but now recognise the problem straight away!
--
Ron



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
from "Ron Lowe" <ronATlowe-famlyDOTmeDOTukSPURIOUS> contains these words:

A cultural thing. In the 60s and 70s you would expect a swag lamp or a pole lamp to be powered from such a switched receptacle. Quaint, maybe, but I was quite partial to the things. Indeed I staill have an American swag lamp in use (in the UK), taken from our lounge when we left North America and hooked up in our front room here. Not from a socket switched from the door, however :-(. If it were switched from the door I might have installed a 2A socket :-).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or just switched table/etc lights - to stop people plugging a fan heater into a lighting circuit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12 Mar 2009 17:02:10 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

In the back of my mind I've a hunch that there was also a 10A socket, too - somewhere between the 5A and 15A sizewise.
--
Frank Erskine

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2a & 5a plug tops are traditionally smaller in size to conventional 13a 3pin plugs
They are still available - try Abacus Electrical Supplies www.abacuselectricalsupplies.co.uk
url:http://myreader.co.uk/msg/1391142637.aspx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They are but the socket plate size is the same.

Every electrical wholesaler I know stocks them. And some even have online catalogues. ;-)
--
*60-year-old, one owner - needs parts, make offer

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Calling Medway Handyman
Can you fo round and firebomb these spammers please ?
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.