Reusing compression olives

"BillR" wrote in message

Not when it's a replica of a 1910-ish Gustav Bros. mantel clock (although their was analogue clockwork)
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wrote:

At £24.46 inc VAT +PP, this is very expensive to use for the odd occassion. And only for 15mm too. I supose a similar price for the 22mm and more for a 28mm. Not cheap at all.
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Supposedly a hacksaw. My opinion is that you're more likely to get success (and much more quickly) by reusing the old olive than hacking the pipe around. You can get proper olive removers, but they're expensive.

I think I may have misread the original question. Obviously, you reuse the olive if just retightening an old joint. I was thinking that the entire valve had been replaced. (i.e. replacing handwheel with TRV).
Christian.
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On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 15:59:01 +0000, Christian McArdle wrote:

Even in this case I would leave the nut+olive on the supply pipe unless the new valve was one of the sort where the 'nut' is now in the form of a plug.
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On Friday, 5 December 2003 15:59:01 UTC, Christian McArdle wrote:

You will never get one off intact or without damaging the pipe Occasionally they leak when reconnected Just needs a bit of PTFE tape wrapped round them to fix the problem.
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On Thu, 07 Dec 2017 02:02:51 -0800, harry wrote:

It took you 14 years and 2 days to answer that one Harry! Been busy? :)
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Talking bollocks too. Admittedly rarely get one off intact (except when it’s been on stainless steel pipe) but not too hard to remove without any damage to the pipe. Done it many times.
Tim
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On Thu, 07 Dec 2017 16:35:25 +0000, Tim+ wrote:

Slide hammer?
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Dremel type device, slim cutting disk and cut a partial thickness groove in it (I usually do it on the diagonal). When deep enough (but obviously not full thickness if you want to avoid damage to the pipe) insert the tip of a good screwdriver in the slot and twist. This will then snap the olive.
The most important part is to make your cut as clean as possible with vertical sides so that the screwdriver tip gets a good purchase.
Tim
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I do exactly that, but with a junior hacksaw.
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you
I don't normally replace the olive unless I want to replace the nut as well (with a nice shiny new one) that you can't remove because of the olive.
To remove the old olive I use a junior hacksaw blade and cut through the olive as far as I dare, so the pipe is not damaged. Then using a suitable flat bladed screwdriver put in the slot and twist. The olive should then become free (as will the nut!).
Dave
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how
well
So long as the fitting hasn't been over tightened I find you can usually get the old olive off by adjusting a large adjustable spanner to snuggly fit the pipe, and using it as a slide hammer on the nut of the fitting against the olive. But having got it off I wouldn't re-use it unless my back was to the wall (ie Sunday night everywhere closed and wife wants a shower!) and then I would aneal it (heat to red hot) before use.
Andrew Mawson
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IME if the fitting is done up properly and not distorted, there is no need to replace the olive.

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On the issue of removing olives ( not required when reffiting existing compression joints..usually ) I noticed a plumber using an olive nibbler. Looked like a pair of pliers whith biting ends. Just cut through an olive in a second leaving the pipe intact.

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On 5 Dec 2003 15:18:38 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (dave) wrote:

One of these perhaps:
http://tinyurl.com/xy2t
PoP
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I don't, often (almost allways) they are stuck to the pipe real well.
I just clean them up, and re-wrap with PTFE.
Rick
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Rick Dipper wrote:

> > I don't, often (almost allways) they are stuck to the pipe real well. > > I just clean them up, and re-wrap with PTFE.
You probably don't even need the PTFE: I either use nothing but the olive or, if the joint is likely to be inaccessible, a bit of boss white. Seems to work pretty well!
Ben.
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Never had any problems with this method and no joints ever jumped apart!
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Use some Boss White and re-use the olive.
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I also use Andrew's slide hammer method. If the joint was made correctly in the first place and not over tightened, then the olive comes off fairly easily. If it does fit a new olive. If not then a few wraps of PTFE, or jointing compound.
If using jointing compound, for those who may not be aware, be sure it's fit for the purpose,especially if using compression joints on potable (drinking) water supplies. Boss White is not suitable for use on potable water.
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