Repairing microwave oven

Four years ago I paid £60 for an LG Microwave oven with a grill from Tescos.
Now the microwave part does not work. Electricity is getting through since the grill still works.
Is there anything that is likely to be wrong like the magnetron easily repaired at home or replaced by d-i-y ?
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After serious thinking john turner wrote :

At £60 new, probably not worth the cost of sourcing parts.
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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Yes you don't say if its one of the mechanical knob type or one with a nice electronic control The faults on these things tend to be in two areas. #The control logic and high power switching, or the high voltage part with its diodes etc. I'd agree that apart from being very hard to source parts, its also highly dangerous trying to fault find where such high voltages could be present. Brian
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-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
thanks to all. makes you wonder if a charity takes in stuff and repairs it to sell on?
just found a panasonic with grill from co-operative electrical for £66.99 which can't be bad?
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On 24/08/2012 10:40, john turner wrote: ------------------------------------------

Very unlikely, for the reasons NT says
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For every complex problem, there is a solution which is simple, neat,
and wrong.
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john turner explained on 24/08/2012 :

Not many charities will accept electrical item these days.
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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: > : > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- : > : > thanks to all. makes you wonder if a charity takes in stuff and repairs it to : > sell on? : > : > just found a panasonic with grill from co-operative electrical for £66.99 : > which can't be bad? : : Not many charities will accept electrical item these days. : : -- : Regards, : Harry (M1BYT) (L) : http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk : : Hello Harry. I'm finding that more of the local charity shops are now accepting (small) electrical appliances because the shops now have access to PAT facilities. I'm pleased about this as it means that unwanted electrical appliances aren't necessarily destined for the scrap heap.
Regards, Ian.
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john turner wrote:

They don't. Repair costs are too high, and there are implications for liability in cases where the repair fails.
Sold by them "as seen" with their liability limited to a refund if it goes wrong before you get it home is the charities' business model.
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Tciao for Now!

John.

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it can be any part of the system, all fail

trivially easy

not if you know how to do it safely.

parts from scrapped ovens cost next to nothing

Not that I've ever seen. There's no sense in doing so when they can get plenty of already working stuff.

nukes are rarely bad IME, unless you go back to ones from the 70s and before
NT
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My guess is that the OP doesn't know where to find the parts nor has experience of "how to do it safely" otherwise they'd not have posted in the first place.
Regards, Ian.
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wrote:

obviously
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Yes, if you understand a bit of electronics, including how to handle what is the most dangerous household appliance under the hood
NT
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If you look inside you will find fuses. Chances are that one will have blown. These used to be called the microwave repair man's bread and butter.

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On Friday, August 24, 2012 3:33:47 PM UTC+1, Mr Pounder wrote:

yes and they aren't always easy to find either. I was asked to order one a 10 amp 20mm On replacing it, it blew. Apparnelty it was a known problem...

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On Fri, 24 Aug 2012 08:18:21 -0700 (PDT), whisky-dave

1uf C @ 2.5kV - no thanks.
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Main input fuse blowing is normally a deliberate action when the door interlock fails. You don't replace that fuse until you have found the cause of the door interlock failure, and fixed it. You would normally replace the two door microswitches too, as they have been used to crowbar the supply in order to blow the fuse, and even if they weren't the original problem, they are quite likely to be faulty or out of spec after deliberately shorting out the supply.
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Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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On Aug 24, 8:06 pm, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Indeed. And a 20mm fuse is entirely unsuitable, and the shorting resistor must be checked, and all these parts are safety critical components. Easy to do, but you do need to know how.
NT
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Could people stop using weird editors to post here? all these 2020 in the text makes the result almost unreadable.
Brian
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Brian Gaff wrote:

Google again, I'm afraid.
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Tciao for Now!

John.

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Yes, although I could have fixed it in my followup, I was being lazy.
Mr Pounder included an 8-bit character (pound sign). My news client assumed iso-8859-1 encoding and displayed it correctly, although Mr Pounder's news client failed to indicate what 8-bit charset he was using (and there is no News header to do so in the spec anyway).
In whisky-dave's posting which quotes the pound sign, google has very naugtily MIME encoded the body-part, which is not a valid thing to do for a News message. I presume it's done this because of the 8-bit character in the original, which it's recoded into UTF-8. This is valid in an email message, and if using an email client to read news, it will probably work OK, but MIME is not part of the News protocol. If anyone updated the protcol today, it would likely get included, but the News protocol hasn't been updated since 7-bit ASCII was the assumed norm, and so sending things like a pound sign (which doesn't exist in 7-bit ASCII) will cause news clients to do their own incompatible things, and that's when things like raw quoted-printable text (the and �) may end up leaking out visibly.
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Andrew Gabriel
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