recycling bricks....

is it a good idea?
chip mortar off old bricks
then use them to build a low soil-retaining wall in the back garden?
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Reply to
Gill Smith
In article , "Gill Smith" writes:
Depends what condition the bricks are in, how easily the mortar comes off without damaging the bricks, and if the bricks will be suitable for the new intended use.
A soil retaining wall will need low absorbency frost resistant bricks. (It will also need designing to withstand the soil pressure, and to allow drainage from the soil, depending on size.)
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
stocks a few years back. It's now nicely weathered and still intact. Unless you're trying to retain a clay soil, or it's considerably higher than that, I wouldn't bother with footings. Lime mortar usually comes off the old bricks easily, cement can be a pain though
Reply to
stuart noble
In article , snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com says...
Provided the bricks are frost-proof, or at least that you cap them with something that is, then it's a nice way to save money and feel good.
Reply to
Skipweasel
capping alone is not enough. Experience is that any porous bricks in deep shade in winter will get frost-smashed especially if on the north side of a structure.
Yes, the capping takes the worst of it as they tend to get wettest, but even so the face bricks are subject to driving rain that will be to an extent retained.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
In article , snipped-for-privacy@invalid.invalid says...
Coat of damp-seal should shed most of that. Anyway - if it's not a critical wall then in some places it might look pleasantly rustic.
Of course, in other circumstances it might just look like a pile of crap.
Reply to
Skipweasel
a previous owner built a low soil-retaining garden wall
seemingly out of re-used bricks
it's bowed in the middle
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Reply to
Gill Smith
*and* single brick width!!!
I tell you, if house abuse were a crime, previous owner(s) would be hung....
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Reply to
Gill Smith
On Jan 30, 10:58=A0am, "Gill Smith" wrote:
its slow, but if you need to save the money or the bricks are handmades, it tends to be worth it.
If theyre frost resistant enough, fine. If not they may still be good for some of the wall, but not all.
NT
Reply to
Tabby
Easy with a scutching hammer if the mortar is lime, often potland mortar is harder than the bricks.
AJH
Reply to
andrew
In article , snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com says...
Was that a result of reuse of bricks, or would they have cocked it up anyhow?
Reply to
Skipweasel
Thats not as easy as it sounds. If a strong mix has been used it can be a bugger to chip off & can damage the bricks in the attempt. It also takes ages.
Reply to
The Medway Handyman
you can be sure of a good measure of cock-up in everything done to this house
it'd all be funny if I wasn't now the owner
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Reply to
Gill Smith
In article , snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com says...
Did it have a loo like this?
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Reply to
Skipweasel
On Jan 31, 4:20 am, "Gill Smith" wrote:
Here in NZ, old (cleaned) bricks cost more than new bricks. I use them for paths and low walls. My walls are always a single brick width, and I'm about to build a brick wall a half brick high, i.e. about 2 inches high! At least that won't fall down.
Want to see what happens to brick houses in a NZ earthquake?
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Reply to
Matty F
In article , snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.nz says...
Bah - nothing you can't fix with a grinder and a bit of filler.
Reply to
Skipweasel
come off easy enough, sharp bolster, should most come off with one hit with a hammer.
When you re-lay them use a weak mix ... 5:1 (sand : opc)
Reply to
Rick Hughes

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