Q about 1930s build

Our 1930s house (standard front porch 3-bed bay windows) had a garage to the side, with the garage roof sweeping up in line with the house roof (so forming a very large bit of roof). I assume therefore that there night have been a large attic space above the garage, or perhaps there was no ceiling as such.
But I also assume there would have had to have been ceiling joists anyway. But, how would these have been supported on the house wall side? I've seen those galvanised cradles that a joist rests in, but presumably they didn't use those in the 30s, am I right? In which case would the builder have cut out half-brick sized holes to rest them on?
Since then (and before our time here) someone extended the property by converting the garage to accommodation and adding a second story over the garage. This is or the north side of a westerly-facing house.
Problem is that, when there's a strong cold westerly or northerly, this new part of the house gets very cold. So I'm minded to wonder how the cold air is getting in. One scenario is air under the house being forced into the cavity wall (now entirely internal) that used to be an outside wall, up and through the holes where the joists are, and into the under-first-floor space. Is this sort of thing likely?
--
Tim

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d,

Yes quite likely that air is circulating in this cavity. If there are air bricks round the property, definitely so. The answer is cavity wall fill/insulation. Check by measuring that it IS a cavity wall first of course.
Normal practice pre joist hangers was the either cut holes in the brickwork or to bolt on a wall plate (horizontal bit of wood) and rest/ nail the rafters on that.
They may have been resting on the existing/present wall plate for the house roof.
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On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 00:52:49 -0700 (PDT), harry wrote:

Yes, the 1930's semi I was dragged up in had 9" solid brick walls. The garage ceiling joists would have been fitted into sockets in the walls, probably gaps left as the wall was built. Have a look at how the ceiling joists fit into the party wall in the loft space.
As for cold extension. When was that built(ish)? Cavity wall above the garage level? Insulated? The orginal garage walls where probably single skin with piers, these may have been demolished and replaced or simple blockwork built inside leaving a cavity. Insulated?
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Dave.
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All the other outside walls are cavity, we've had them filled. Above the old garage is now second storey built using studwork [1] so I'd have to take the floor up to check. That may happen, longer term, as I might want to have the CH pipework runs redone for that section.

Extension built about 6 years ago. Original garage wall retained, upper story stud and tile-hung. Oddly, there are some piers but the garage wall was cavity, that was filled a couple of years ago.
We had the floor up in one of the (new) upstairs rooms in the extension, I found I could reach under the floor and touch the boarding on which the tiles are hung - and the sharp ends of the nails that were used to attach the battens on for tiles to hang on. At least in that room I had celotex blocks put between the joists around the edge of the room and fibre-glass under the floor, so it's a bit better now.
[1] Probably because the foundations under the garage area wouldn't take a brick second storey.
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Tim

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wrote:

So it's a wooden hut built on top of the garage? What did Building Control ask for as insulation? Or have I misunderstood?
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In article

:-)
Pretty sure as it seems very thick. Anyway, if it is I could get it filled from the attic.

Thanks - that's helpful. I've got a copy of the plans submitted to the City Council when this recent work was done, I need to check them. I suppose it's possible that may not match as-built, though.
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Tim

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In message

Also what did they do with the original garage wall and presumed concrete floor?
You might be able to research the alteration plans through your building control dept. records.
I was able to find the plans for the flat my wife inherited. 1960's and on micro-fiche but readable.

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Tim Lamb

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Still there (it is a cavity wall) and acting as the outer wall for the new ground floor rooms. Upper is stud/tile hung. Concrete floor now has suspended floor above it for the downstairs.

Got those. As I mentioned in reply to harry, I need to examine them now from this PoV.
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Tim

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Hmm.. I don't think a suspended floor over uninsulated concrete goes anywhere near the current thermal requirements.
Sounds as though their building inspector had his eyes shut:-(

Saw that. I like the shed on brick allusion:-)

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