mould on rafters in loft

Hi All,
There is mould on the rafters of my loft after a loft conversion was done by a loft company and roofer in late 2009 and early 2010.
In November 2009 the loft did get quite wet during the very wet spell when the roofers failed to keep the rain out.
This meant it took ages to dry out as "breathable" under-felt had been added beneath new tiles. And the loft area was not heated until the spring. This was not a cheap job.
However there is still some mould on the rafters - despite the whole loft becoming bone dry during the summer.
Is this a problem? I am concerned about dry rot. Should I get a professional around like Rentokill or other professional top take a look?
Please see a photo of the mould as it is now (30 Oct 2010) at:
http://i800.photobucket.com/albums/yy281/georgeturner_2010/loft/loftmould1-1.jpg
Thanks, Tom
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brush it off and watch for it returning. You may have a leak somewhere despite it not being a cheap job
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On 30/10/10 14:05, cynic wrote:

from the pattern of the dampness you should be able to work out whether its from condensation inside, or a leak outside... I'm guessing a leak outside dribbling down...
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On 30/10/2010 13:14, Tom wrote:

http://i800.photobucket.com/albums/yy281/georgeturner_2010/loft/loftmould1-1.jpg
I had similar mould just after a conversion, including a reroof, on my house. The engineer said it was due to lack of ventilation. He got the builder to install some airbricks and checked that there was a free flow of air. The mould went away and hasn't come back.
Peter Scott
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Hopefully its just some dried out surface mould residue - if so its harmless. If its growing though, it will need sorting out. This means taking measures to prevent the leak or condensation happening, it does NOT mean calling a company to apply a wood preservative - something that wont stop it and that you could do yourself for next to nothing.
NT
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The point is that ot doesn't need doing at all.

No, you have to sort out the ventilation.
MBQ
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On 02/11/2010 10:52, Man at B&Q wrote:

Hooray! I thought my message hadn't got through (see above). Yes, it is almost certainly a ventilation problem.
Peter Scott
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