Lath & Plaster Ceiling

Hi,
Whats the easist way ro remove a Lath & Plaster ceiling ? To be exact, how to remove the plaster as I want to keep the lath to put the plasterboard on.
Allthough its cracked and water damaged it still seems pretty robust in places and attacking it with a hammer is going to take ages to get it all down.
Any ideas ?
S
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San Connolly wrote:

There is no easy way except with an hammer. Why worry about the lath, screw the plaster board to the joist.
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Take the lath off too - most of it will break anyway, and it won't be level enough to plasterboard over. Use a claw hammer & wrecking bar. Prepare to be amazed at how much volume of crap you pull down!
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San Connolly wrote:

???
You remove the lath + plaster. You can either kick it down from above, or if there's a floor above you pull it down from below with a crowbar.
--
Grunff

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Grunff wrote:

The edges of the lathes overlap so if you don't take the lathes down the plasteboard wont be flat.I pulled it down with a claw hammer or crow bar then meticulously pulled the hundreds of nails out rather than knocking the in.
Kevin
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Chears, lath + plaster down it is :)
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San Connolly wrote:

I know if I was going to do this I would solidly secure a dust sheet to the ceilng in a four corner arrangement and knock the corners into the dust sheet via the loft if permitting, this would then lessen the clearing up process and dust and make it more easy. :-)
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I was thinking along these lines, but having the sheet on the floor. I presume you basically go in the loft, roll back the insulation and kick the ceiling out, having previously figured out where it actually is from above!
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Connolly" <mrcATseanDASHconnollyDOTcoDOTuk> says...

By far the best way - otherwise you're standing under it as you pull it down. You'll still have to remove some bits of lath and nails from below, but most of the plaster will be gone by then. Most of the nails will probably come out with a hammer and bolster rather than using pincers or a claw hammer on each one, and any broken ones can just be hammered flat. You will probably be surprised at how much rubble you have created.
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Actually I have one wall that is lath and plaster as well (basically a partition wall), on which the plaster is pretty shagged. Would the same apply, just remove the whole lot and put up a new partition wall ?
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"San Connolly" <mrcATseanDASHconnollyDOTcoDOTuk> wrote in message

Don't undersetimate the amount of dirt and dust involved. Open the windows, seal the door and wear a good respirator. No matter how much dirt and dust you expect, there will be more. Its one of the filthiest jobs there is.
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Yeah the guy who is doing all the plastering mentioned this ! The original idea was for him to do the whole lot, but in an atempt to keep costs down I'm doing the unskilled & dirty stuff :(
Could I not cut though the wall with an angle grinder and take the thing down in one piece ? Actually come to think of it that will probably set fire to the wall, so not a good idea!
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San Connolly wrote:

And you think pulling down L&P makes dust wait until you get an angle grinder into the equation!

If you need to cut it a bit more neatly then you can knock a hole through it and then use a reciprocating saw.
--
Cheers,

John.

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"San Connolly" <mrcATseanDASHconnollyDOTcoDOTuk> wrote in message
...

If it needs replacing, it won't come down in one piece, whatever you do.
Colin Bignell
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San Connolly wrote:

If it's that bad, remove the P&L, fix up any cabling you need to do, ensuring that it can be pulled through to replace in future if need be, and replace the P&L with two layers of 1/2" PB.
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Where do you get 1/2 inch plasterboard? B&Q and Wickes only seem to stock 9.5mm pb
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Bob Martin wrote:

I've seen 1/2" (12.5mm) in B&Q, but can't see *any* PB on their useless website. It's commonly available, I'm surprised that these DIY places don't have it - all BMs do.
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Bob Martin wrote:

Silly question this but...have you tried a DIY/local builders yard?
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wrote:

Cheapest place I know of is magnet (yep the kitchen place).
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My local Wickes stocks it. Wheeled 3 large sheets of it home on one of their trollies.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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