Introduction of Ring Circuits

I met up with an older electrician yesterday and was reminiscing as old men do !! I was talking of my teenage years in the mid 1950's and helping my father rewire an old property he'd bought - metal fish wires and threading steel conduit were the 'apprentice's' tasks. The guy challenge my memory on the introduction of ring circuits saying that it was well after that they were brought in (another memory of crossing line and neutral in a box and the resulting impressively big bang when the large cast iron fuse box was thrown on!).
I've no doubt that I was correct but can anyone point to when the ring system was introduced.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_circuit#History_and_use
--
Adam



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
robgraham used his keyboard to write :

I believe during WWII as a means to reduce the amount of copper used.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Thanks guys - I doubt I will meet this guy again but at least knowing the logic behind its development will allow me to be a bit more positive next time I bore someone with my reminiscences. Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Late 1940s. Perhaps you encountered the old 4 fused rings? http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Ring_circuit#History_and_use
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Tabby" wrote in message wrote:

Late 1940s. Perhaps you encountered the old 4 fused rings? http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Ring_circuit#History_and_use
NT
Some fascinating reading - amazing to think that we were fighting a war when people were debating all this.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyBoy wrote:

I've no idea when it was introduced, but it seems a great system to me, as are the fused square-pin plugs.
I spend some time in Italy, and the system there seems very silly, with 3 types of plug (fat and thin 3-pin, and what I take to be the French circular 2-pin).
If only the continent would adopt the UK system, and in return the UK would stop the insane practice of storing water in the roof-space, which at the same time maximises the chance of freezing, and also maximises the damage that will be done when that occurs.
--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ring circuits are superior to radials in terms of safety, reliability and cost, and fwiw eco credentials since they use less copper (in most cases). So its a shame that, due to some foolish thinking being presented as wisdom, they are losing popularity to radials.
Re water in the roof space, what system do you suggest would be better?
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.theiet.org/publishing/wiring-regulations/ringcir.cfm has both pros and cons set out for the meeting held at the IET in 2007. (As the merest dilettante I was persuaded that radials were better than rings, and trees better than both.)
--
Robin
PM may be sent to rbw0hotmailcom
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lovegrove's commentary in the disadvantages pdf there shows how devoid of elementary logic his views are.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
something like:

Beer in the roof space, of course.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tabby wrote:

Do they use this system anywhere else in the world?
--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think you do have to remember that the UK in all likelihood introduced piped water to its populace first, and that the tank in the attic was the solution to cover the possibility of irregularity in the supply. So it's historical, just as much as the ring main was introduced for what is now a historical reason.
I would suggest that your aggression on the topic has almost a hysterical atmosphere to it; like ring mains the very significant majority in the UK is happy with a) it's domestic electrical distribution, and b) it's water system.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
robgraham wrote:

yep. And in future if Huhne gets his way we will need a battery in the roof as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
robgraham wrote:

Minimizing the quantity of copper required seems to me entirely reasonable, today as much as in the past. Presumably it saves a little power, as well as copper.
Storing water in the roof seems to me entirely unreasonable, even for the purpose you mention. In Italy where I spend a lot of time, they have public taps in the street for any occasion when it might be necessary (which is never, in my experience to date).
My viewpoint is that if the pressure is sufficient to get the water up to the roof, it is more than enough to get it to the loo.
--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Timothy Murphy wrote:

The British system came about when available mains supplies couldn't keep up with the peak demand. The tank in the loft filled up overnight, and emptied when the family had their wash and used the toilet before they went to work, then refilled again during the day while everybody was at work.
In the last half Century, things have improved to the point where the mains can cope, though when I woke up a few months back to no water at the drinking water tap and a water feature in the street outside, my passengers were very glad I had a bathful of water in the loft tank.
--
Tciao for Now!

John.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The mains supply round here can't cope with filling a bath quickly. And I doubt it can anywhere if fed via the usual 15mm pipe.
--
*Women like silent men; they think they're listening.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have a combi boiler and no tank, and my mains pressure is pretty good.
Neil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In message

Yeah, but it won't help wit filling the bath at a decent rate.
The combi will be the limiting factor here though - the rate at which it can heat the water. Takes ages to fill a bath - good shower though
--
Chris French


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
chris French wrote:

I've never noticed that baths take a long time to fill in France or Italy.
--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.