Internal glass door building regs?

Man at B&Q wrote:

How is the 'issue is people falling through and being literally cut to ribbons' not what I said, when I did say it?

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wrote:

The data on this commercial site is AFAICR correct and worth a look:
http://www.warmedgeunits.com/safety.html
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Bob Mannix
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Bob Mannix wrote:

I think so too.
So whilst not strictly necessary in all cases, unless there is a resoan not to, fit toughened safety glass everywhere you can.
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You also said "In fact all glass used these days in a house has to be unless the pane size is very small as in e.g. leaded lights or small framed panels.."
You totally omitted any mention of height from the ground being a criteria for the rewuirement of safety fglass.
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

My local glass place has a big chart on the wall showing exactly what you can use & where.
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Dave - The Medway Handyman
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Glass used in wondows which are less than a certain distance from the floor (about 1m I think) have to be toughened - above that and normal glass can be used.
ALL glass in doors, and in windows which are attached to doors, IE like in a combination frame, have to be toughened glass, irrespective of distance from the floor.
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Phil L
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I dont think that is correct. My glazier says it can be either toughened, or laminated. Laminated is around a third cheaper, albeit at the expense of a thicker glass section. He also puts the BS mark on his laminated glass. Alan.
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mogga wrote:

There are. They're called the Building Regulations, and they say that if you carry out building work or make a material change of use of a building, the work you do must meet the guidance, and (in the case of alterations) the work you do mustn't make any other part of the building any less compliant than before.
If you carry out any work that affects the building's structure or fire safety, and as part of that, you replace or alter the internal door, then, yes, you have to fit safety glass to that door to comply with Building Regulations.
If you're just replacing the door or the glass, it must comply with the General Product Safety Regulations 1994. This is controlled by Trading Standards at your local or County Council. I assume it's controlled reactively, i.e., following a complaint or serious HSE-reportable accident.
If it's an existing pane, I don't know if there are any regulations covering its continued use. I can't imagine there are within a private dwelling, unless some legal or informal registration schemes for HMOs or student accommodation, etc., would cover it.
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Hugo Nebula
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