How do I dispose of this bulb?

clumsy bastard wrote:

Since so many of us are describing what our local council is doing, here's a report for (parts of) Halton Borough (Runcorn & Widnes)
Black wheely bin for landfill Green wheely bin (garden waste) collected fortnightly between spring and autumn. Blue small wheelybin for paper, card, metal, glass, plastic collected fornightly.
Low-cost compost bins available online (we have 2)
Nett result is that we usually have about 1 carrier bag full of waste to go in the landfill per week, with everything else being composted or sent for recycling.
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Phil the Farmer wrote:

Sadly, I have to confess that we have more than this. 9x% of our putresibles go to the home composters along with all garden waste ( other than trees which I've had to knock down last year). I thankfully found a neighbour with a wood burning stove that was keen to collect the big bits!
For many years, we have always taken separated white/ green/ brown glass to separate collection facilities when going shopping. The local council collect all glass in one and thereby reduce the value. The local Tesco which we use most frequently has now gone on to common collection of all glass. Most annoying as clear glass has a value in the UK whilst the other two do not - not quite true but green and brown of lower value.
With the over-persecution of plastic bags now, I can see a wonderous new product being sold for kitchen bins - bin-liner bags!
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Waste of time.
Talking of which, recycling is only worth doing if you assign zero value to the time of the forced labour (householders) doing it.
--
"Please try to understand, the one you call Messiah is a lie."
[email me at huge huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
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As is most "recycling". Cardboard seems to be recycled pretty thoroughly, so I've no objection to paper/cardboard recycling since it's fairly simple. Cans should also be recycled but I'm less sure that councils treat them appropriately. The market is flooded with cullet so "recycling" glass seems a complete waste of time. Firstly it's not much of an environmental hazard. All Flesh is Grass, All Sand is Glass. Secondly the major use for it nowadays seems to be as hardcore.
I had been fairly careful at work to use the bin marked for PET and drinks cans since there seemed to be a fair chance these would b recycled. Then I spotted the cleaner emptying both containers into the same waste skip.
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 16:49:07 -0000, "Fred Finisterre"

Are you sure it's really dead ?
"Dynamo" Hansen's CFL's last 20 years +
It's a Chinese Yellow, maybe it's just pining for it's homeland, the place of it's birth on the banks of the Yangtze Kiang.
;-)
Derek
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This recycling business seems to definitely be 'A work in progress'! Here ANY fluorescent tube or CFL is NOT SUPPOSED to be put into garbage pickup! They are all (now) classed as 'Hazardous waste'. However like anything also, one or two 'hidden' CFLs in the regular garbage pickup go gaily on their way to end up in the dump (tip) and be buried. (Along with regular light bulbs and everything else including much bigger items!) Particularly since there seems to be no procedure set up by the local recycling depots to accept them! However one or two 48 inch fluorescent tubes put out in the garbage pickup were left by side of the road; don't know if that's how one got 'accidentally on purpose' broken, but have our suspicions. Based on a couple of complaints about the occasional actions of one garbage collection contractor!
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terry wrote:

We now have three wheelie bins; one green for food / garden / compostible waste that is emptied each week, the original grey one that is not designated recyclables, and a purple lidded version for "rubbish" - these are emptied each week in alternation. Instructions explicitly say that all bulbs, and batts are to be thrown in the rubbish one and not the recyclables. (Not sure how you are supposed to dispose of a long tube though). Dog crap is apparently also rubbish and not compost. So there is no consistency either.
--
Cheers,

John.

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I have 4 schemes to contend with -- mine, and 3 other family households all in different council areas whose rubbish I put out from time to time. They've all got completely different rules about what can go in what bin, when they collect if it's a bank holiday, etc.
There's some rule that requires councils to prevent batteries going into landfill, which none seem to have complied with. Ours was going to distribute post-paid envelopes to put used batteries in so you post them back to the council, but that never took off (I wouldn't be surprised if the Royal Mail didn't like the idea of pillar boxes full of leaking batteries).
I notice some of the large customers I deal with in the City have battery collection bins at work intended for their staff to bring in all their dead batteries from home. I don't know who organises that, but that's probably one of the cheapest ways to collect them.
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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On 21 Jan, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

We get given small labelled plastic bags (about A5 size) in which to put small batteries in. This is then put in the recyclables box for kerbside sorting once a fortnight. It seems to work well.
--
B Thumbs
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Whilst the process might work well, I doubt that this stacks up environmentally. More plastic and I assume that the bags are delivered.
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On Fri, 23 Jan 2009 23:06:13 -0000, Clot wrote:

We can get small bags for the Local Linck Centre (combined Library, Tourist Information Center and Council (district and County) Information Center). These are then dropped into the post, postage paid. To somewhere in the Midlands.

Plastic is no longer the nasty it was, most, if not all is biodegradeable. If it wasn't we would be up to our necks in supermarket bags considering how many are used every year. Not sure when the change happened, we have so old (10 year) supermarket bags that are still soft and useable yet ones only a year or two old fall apart when you look at them. These bags have been kept inside with things in, not buried outside.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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news:49779884$0$512

As well as collecting fluorescent bulbs, IKEA also have a bin for batteries.
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Barnsley "four bins" council have
grey - rubbish green - garden waste and cardboard (1)(2) blue - paper (3) brown - glass and cans
(1) the cardboard must not be thick cardboard (2) the cardboard must not have come into contact with food (3) no telephone directories
The grey bin goes out on alternate weeks to the other three bins.
The wheelie bin police do come around every now and again and have a look inside the bins but never the grey bin.
The council did offer free composting bins at one point but as I believe that composting nearly killed my Mum I am not a big fan of it.
Adam
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ARWadsworth wrote:

We can stick thick cardboard in ours, but only board with no sticky tape on it. Same as envelopes as long as you remove any windows, or gummed edges! (i.e. sod that for a game of soldiers, they can go in the purple rubbish bin)

at least we don't seem to have them...
--
Cheers,

John.

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thats par for the course everywhere, or soon will be
--
all thumbs

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clumsy bastard wrote:

Or maybe not!
The other day I noticed a large headline on one of the daily publications sometimes called newspapers. Said something like all domestic bins are going to be scrapped. We will have bigger bins serving several properties - every 20 houses or whatever.
Struck me that there could be some advantages:
o Someone else is responsible for keeping them clean and working; o Less of our garden occupied by bins; o Possibly emptied more frequently; o No rushing out with bins to catch the collection;
On the other hand:
o We don't want one next door to us; o Can't imagine that, except in a few places, people will respect them and use them all appropriately, quietly and tidily; o I don't fancy having to walk down the street every time a bin needs emptying. And partner can't.
--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
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like in Spain where there are lots of flats

indeed, dont know where they would go here

the Spanish ones look a mess

you would need a bin to collect stuff together till it was worth going to the bigger bin....
--
all thumbs

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On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 11:10:58 +0000, clumsy bastard wrote:

then the council comes alon and empties it...
--
Peter.
You don't understand Newton's Third Law of Motion?
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that could be an idea :-)
--
all thumbs

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clumsy bastard wrote:

Ah, a plastic bag?
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