Hot Water Pressure

Is it possible to increase the pressure of hot water from my taps and if so How? Thanks in anticipation of any help given.
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so
More detail. What type of system, etc.
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Not sure what you mean by what type of system. We have an immersion heater and also a gas central heating boiler and whichever is used the pressure/flow rate isn't very strong. We have a mixer bath tap and when I fill the bath the cold just seems to take precedent and I end up with a cold bath.

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heater
Sounds like you have a mains cold/gravity hot cylinder system. It is possible that you have gravity on both supplies, but this doesn't seem likely.
Assuming that this is the case, the cheapest solution will be a single impellor pump on the hot side only. You may need to install a flange on the cylinder, if it starts pumping air. If you had gravity both sides, you need a twin impellor pump.
Some more expensive solutions are:
1. (For a very marginal improvement) Raise the cold water tank higher. 2. Install an unvented cylinder. 3. Install a heat bank. 4. Install an instantaneous combi (will help pressure for showers, but will not provide rapid bath filling)
I have personally used both the single impellor pump method and the heat bank method. The pump actually provided greater flow rates, but the heat bank takes less room (no cold tank) and doesn't make a noise.
Christian.
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the
need
will
You know quite well there are high flow combis that fill baths very quickly, so why give misinformation tio this man?
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Because "fill bath quickly" and combi boiler don't exist in the same sentence nor in this world
"Doctor Combi Boilers are shite"
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No Hot Baths wrote:

Maybe not in this country...
Back in GodZone we had a Rinnai 24 infinity hot water supply. It would supply something like 24l/minute of water at 55C (Apparently they got up to 36l/min). You could get it hotter, but that required adjustment of the unit. The temp was also selectable (Via two units, one in the bathroom, one in the kitchen)... A shower? Select 42C. Washing the dishes 55C.
The unit sat on the outside wall & was gas fired. Yes it filled the bath quickly...
When we left Wellington 7 years ago it was becomming pretty standard for new houses to have them instead of hot water storage. Considering when we move here the shower had an electric unit that must have supplied

Make that the UK water supply is shite too...
H
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wrote:

In the US many are going over to multi-points that output 200,000 plus BTUs/hr. On-demand hot water is regarded as much superior to stored water. Bosch, Takagi and Rinnai are the big players. Two combi's is roughly the same output. The largest output multi-point in the world is a Takagi at 50 litres per minute. Not available in the UK yet, and commercial only at 380,000 BTU/hr

No it isn't . In most places high flows from the mains can be had. In many places it may mean replacing the pipe from the street with a new plastic pipe. High flow combi's are available. The problem is that people here think that all combi's are like the cheapo low flow offerings, that are superb for 2 bedroom flats with only a shower. This poster is clearly a spammer working for a cylinder company.
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wrote:

quickly,
I think we have a spammer here. Never seen him before on this ng,
You obviously haven't a clue what you are on about. read this.....and read it properly...
Here is a run down on combi's:
Firstly, a combi is a "combination" of the heating and water system in one case, eliminating external tanks and cylinders, and generally supply hot water at high main pressure. To confuse a little, some can run at very low pressures and even off tanks. Generally most are fed from the mains. It is generally a matter of mounting the boiler and connect up the pipes. The expert designers have done the hard work for you and put all in one case.
Types of combi:
1) The Infinitely Continuous Combi -
Heats cold mains water instantly as it runs through the combi. It never runs out of hot water. This is the most common type of combi, generally having lower flowrates than Nos 2 & 3 below. The largest flow rate instant combi is a two bathroom model, 22 litres/min ECO-Hometec. Being a condenser it is very economical too. http://www.eco-hometec.co.uk
2) Unvented Cylinder Combi -
An unvented cylinder is a similar to a conventional cylinder but run off the high-pressure cold mains. A combi with an integral unvented cylinder has approx 60 litre cylinder heated to approx 80C, with a quick recovery coil that takes all the boilers output. A fast acting cylinder thermostat ensures the boiler pumps heat into the cylinder ASAP with a recovery rate from cold around 5-8 mins (Ariston claim 8 mins). The 80C water is blended down to about 45-50C. e.g's, Ariston Genus 27 Plus, Glow Worm, Powermax, Alpha CD50.
3) Infinately Continuous/Unvented cylinder combi -
An example being the Alpha CD50, a combination of both having a two stage flowrate, of high flowrate when using the stored water with an automatic flow regulator switching in to reduce flow to an infinately continuous flowrate of approx 13-14 litres/min. http://www.alpha-boilers.com/products/CD50.html
4) Heat Bank Combi -
Incoming water is instantly heated running through a plate heat exchanger (as is most instantaneous combi's) that takes its heat from a "domestic hot water only" store of water at approx 80C (instantaneous combi's take the heat from a heat-exchanger heater via the burner). A fast acting thermostat ensures the boiler pumps all of its heat into the store ASAP with a recovery rate about 5-8 mins from cold. The 80C water is blended down to about 45-50C. They are generally two stage flow rates, in that when the thermal store is exhausted it reverts to what the burner can produce, which is approx 11-12 litre/minute. e.g. Vokera & Worcester floor standing models (standard washing machine sizes).
N.B. The heat bank is a variation of a thermal store, but is "not" a thermal store in the conventional sense in that a coil carrying cold mains water runs though a store of hot water kept at about 80C. Heat-banks are far more efficient and give higher flowrates than conventional coiled thermal stores. The stainless steel plate heat-exchangers do not scale up so easily.
5) Combined Primary Storage Unit
(Not classed as a combi, but a derivative of a combi, but still a one box solution, so still in the same family)
These are a combination of a large thermal store, or heat bank, and boiler in one casing. The units are large (larger than standard washing machine size) and floor mounted. The heating is taken off the thermal store, which in many cases the DHW taken off the store using a plate heat-exchanger (heat-bank). Unlike the Heat-bank in 3) above the thermal store supplies heating "and" DHW, giving the "combined" to the title. They are available from 1 to 2.5 bathroom models. Gledhill do an excellent condensing version, the Gulfsream 2000. http://www.gledhill.net
Nos. 2), 3), 4) & 5) have high flowrates. No. 1 "generally" has low flowrates but there are always exceptions and some can be high - e.g. the ECO-Hometec infinitely continuous combi, actually has a very high flowrate. Nos 2), 3), 4) & 5) use stored water, but in different ways. Unlike No. 1 "some" versions will eventually run cold, but that takes quite a time, hence some are referred to as "two bathroom" models, having the ability to fill two baths with very fast recovery rates. As hot water is being drawn off the high rating burner is also reheating. Very rare do these combi's run out of hot water in average use. When taking one shower the burner may be re-heating faster than what can be drawn-off. No. 3) above uses stored water but will not run out of hot water (high and low flowrates). Most versions of No. 4) above are two stage flowrate models (high and low flowrates) and will also not run out of hot water.
There are combi models that give hot water and heating simultaneously as Combined Primary Storage Units do. Most don't as they are hot water priority.
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I've used a Grundfos Hot water booster with success, it's silent, but may not be powerful enough for you, but has plenty for me.
I should lose the mixer tap and replace with separate ones (I hope it's the type that spans two holes!)
Mixers are very bad news with big pressure differentials, the cold water can pretty well stop the hot from leaving the cylinder - much better to have a separate cold tap
mike
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so
The answer is yes. However, the method depends on what system you already have, your connection to the street and what you want to spend.
Christian.
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Turn the top of the tap more fully anticlockwise.
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Thats flow, not pressure. Two entirely different things.
Tim..
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