Hole in thin steel

I want to make about a 1.25" hole in the base of a few food cans. What's the best option?
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Joerg's rubberaulic press!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A chassis punch hole cutter normally used for front panel holes. Qmax type. I bought a set many years ago, even then it cost 35 pounds for 5 cutters and a reamer. I have used a step drill succesfully, But it needed a lot of care. Go slowly.
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On Tue, 14 Jun 2016 09:01:43 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How 'about' do you want? Octal valve holder chassis punch, 1 1/8" (1.125") IIRC. Still got one somewhere.
Or this punch, 1.28" on Ebay, http://tinyurl.com/ja6e5gt if you're prepared to fork out ~£17
Or a Toolstation hole saw from this list http://tinyurl.com/htfkoxq probably the cheapest. But you'll need the arbor and pilot drill, scroll down.
--

Chris

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A Q-Max punch. Ebay. Cheaper copies available too. Gives a nice neat hole with a safe edge on one side.
--
*We are born naked, wet, and hungry. Then things get worse.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 14/06/16 17:01, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wiederman press.
--
Microsoft : the best reason to go to Linux that ever existed.

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32mm ARMEG Acceler8%.
Probably the best steel hole cutting saw I have ever used.
If you have other uses for them then consider buying a kit with different sizes and spare springs etc
--
Adam


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On Tuesday, 14 June 2016 19:32:32 UTC+1, ARW wrote:

Surely this can be done with a knife. It's what canopeners do. The question in my mind is what sort of knife, and what to rest the can base on etc.
Punches are overly expensive for a few cans, and IMLE distort the f out of what they cut. Holesaws are possible, but it sounds a painful option.
NT
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You have answered your own question. Buy a sharp knife and use your wrists to support the can base when cutting the hole.
--
Adam


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On Tuesday, 14 June 2016 21:10:19 UTC+1, ARW wrote:

I'm considering using a cheap 1/4" wood chisel. Rounded edge would be better, but not worth doing for 3 holes. Perhaps you'd hold the cans for me :)
NT
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And you had to ask on a newsgroup how to make a rough hole in a tin can?
FFS.
--
Adam


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On Tuesday, 14 June 2016 22:22:08 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You can tidy the hole up using a small flapwheel or one of those small abrasive wheels that goes in a drill chuck.
Or a drill file. Or a hand file fitted into a drill chuck.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes

In the absence of the suggested hole cutter... mark out the required hole on the bottoms of your tins. Fix a length of squared timber (hardwood best) vertically in your bench vice and place your first tin over the end. Take your cheap but recently sharpened wood chisel and mallet and gently cut along the line. Move the tin to fresh wood as the surface becomes indented.
Tidy rough edges with a flapwheel in your electric drill.

--
Tim Lamb

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On Wednesday, 15 June 2016 08:59:45 UTC+1, Tim Lamb wrote:

that was the initial plan.

dremel better I reckon. A spanner might be quickest.
NT
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Depends on what sort of hole you want to end up with quality wise.

They only work very well when cutting the entire base of the food can away.

You likely could get away with a big round end of a log of the same diameter as the base of the can with the can sitting on top of that and stabbing thru the metal into that if you don’t care how rough the hole ends up.

But fine if you can borrow one.

Not with a proper chassis punch.

You should be able to do it with a dremel if you don’t need an accurate and clean hole.
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On Tuesday, 14 June 2016 23:24:29 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

t's

Bingo! Practical, cheap & I hope not too slow. Thank you.
NT
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On 6/14/2016 8:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No, look at how they work. They rely on being located close to the rolled seam, which is much stiffer than the relatively unsupported sheet metal in the centre of the base. The Qmax type punch relies on the fact that the two sides are maintained concentric, and they are a relatively close fit.
If you want to do this repeatedly on the same sized can, you need to make a wood insert which is a reasonably close fit, then drill through from the outside with a hole saw (preferably mounted in a pillar drill), supporting the base on the wood insert.
Used properly, hole punches should not distort the main part badly unless the cutter is blunt. Moly disulphide paste may help (also worth putting it on the cap screw thread).

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On Thursday, 16 June 2016 22:27:25 UTC+1, newshound wrote:

I used a die grinder aka dremel, took a few minutes each. Rod was right the 2nd time this century.
NT
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On 14/06/2016 17:01, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

12 bore.
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On 14/06/2016 17:01, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

In descending order of fun...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaped_charge
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_cutting
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_jet_cutter
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_discharge_machining
HTH
But seriously, for a few neat holes, Qmax or similar.
Cheers
--
Syd

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