Help me choose new bathroom flooring with some good ideas!

On Sun, 19 Oct 2014 03:29:40 -0700 (PDT), Eusebius wrote:

If the cork was laid direct on the floor boards without thin ply underneath is why it hasn't lasted.

Read the spec ... Some of these flooring types are specified for "wet" areas others not.

They'll all be cold on your tootsies... the aluminium particularly so. The stone/tiles/mosaic could have electric underfloor heating but that makes for a "thick" floor covering.
Personally I'd look at vynl or laminate/engineered wood specified for "wet" areas. Vynl needs to be laid onto thin ply.
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Dave.
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On Sunday, October 19, 2014 11:29:40 AM UTC+1, Eusebius wrote:

oor with small spaces in between. Presently has cork tiles which are disint egrating.

vinyl after seeing cork tiles wear out in 10 years. Wondering about stuff l ike:

e)

floors at all, though OK with DIY. I'd probably get the floor fitted. It's a small bathroom. I might use the same solution in the small kitchen next t o it.

Vinyl's very practical, but you'd have to lay something on the boards first . Cork feels nice but isnt as easy to clean, and does rot.
Ceramic tiles need a very rigid base to be reliable, I never like to put th em on a wood floor. They feel cold and have greater injury risk. There's al so the grout to clean. A fair choice on concrete where they can last a cent ury, but on wood I wouldnt bother.
NT
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On 19/10/2014 12:38, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

A bigger bath mat. Job done :-)
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I'll have to lay something on the floorboards as you say. Marine ply would be the material of choice, I presume. For rigid tiles I read that 12mm is necessary - that's getting pretty thick in relation to the rest of the flooring.
I'm still considering ceramic tiles - mosaic sheets would be more textured so less slippery. I'm not too worried about a cold feel underfoot, but I'm a bloke and ladies are more sensitive. Could put mats down.
Haven't ruled out some sort of engineered wood, like bamboo.
And curious about rubber flooring - it's a small space so money isn't an issue.
I'm reading recommendations for Karndean, Amtico and Flotex - still researching these.
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On 19/10/2014 12:45, Eusebius wrote:

We have Amtico tiles in out bathroom. Very long wearing and warm to the feet, at least not cold like ceramic tiling.
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On Sunday, October 19, 2014 12:45:47 PM UTC+1, Eusebius wrote:

d be the material of choice, I presume. For rigid tiles I read that 12mm is necessary - that's getting pretty thick in relation to the rest of the flo oring.

d so less slippery. I'm not too worried about a cold feel underfoot, but I' m a bloke and ladies are more sensitive. Could put mats down.

issue.

rching these.
Marine is OTT. Mosaic tiles make the cleaning problem 10x worse. If you use them, I would definitely lithofin it all. Rubber isn't cheap, and I'm not sure it has any upside over vinyl. There's one other option too, duckboard. Very practical, and helps with feet drying somewhat, not attractive though .
NT
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On 19/10/2014 12:45, Eusebius wrote:

Subject to joist spacings, just take the floorboards up (if you're allowed) and replace with waterproof mdf (or ply) of the same thickness. You could stick vinyl straight on to that. Nothing's worse than a small step that serves no purpose.
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On Sunday, October 19, 2014 1:50:18 PM UTC+1, stuart noble wrote:

Ply or 18mm water resistant chip yes, mdf no, unless you want to implement wallace & grommet style automatic delivery from bathroom to breakfast table.
NT
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The Altro hospital flooring sounds absolutely great. Don't know anything about it but reading up on it.
I did think of taking up the floorboards and replacing them with marine ply. I assume that's quite a lot of work, though it is a small bathroom. If it's avoidable it would be a bonus.
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On 19/10/2014 14:01, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Yes, I meant to say chip, not mdf
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On 19/10/14 11:29, Eusebius wrote:

Good vinyl is actually OK stuff - it's the cheap rubbish where the pattern wears off in short order.
Some other ideas:
Slate: It's actually not so slippery when wet.
Wood effect ceramic tiles - I have these in my conservatory - actually look really good and not obviously "fake" (although it is obvious if you actually look at them)
I'd stay well clear of engineered woods or laminates as bathrooms are very unkind to these (there is "waterproof laminate" but I cannot vouch for that).
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On Sunday, October 19, 2014 5:01:15 PM UTC+1, Tim Watts wrote:

We had some textured vinyl designed for bathrooms to reduce slipperiness in the wet. It works to some extent. Simon.
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We fitted waterproof laminate in a bathroom and kitchen in a rented flat five years ago and it now looks completely crap. I haven't looked closely so it might actually be waterproof but just rubbish in every other respect.
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On Sunday, 19 October 2014 11:29:40 UTC+1, Eusebius wrote:

I've got laminate in the bathroom and toilets. No problems with it even with a damp daughter and a minor flood so don't rule it out.
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On 21/10/2014 13:18, matthelliwell wrote:

That Polyfloor stuff referred to earlier is virtually indestructible. Used in hospitals etc
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