Future planning: Propane alternative to oil

Thank goodness I don't need heating oil at the moment. But for next year, what about using propane gas in a bottle as a stopgap?
I'm looking at the webpage http://www.coals2u.co.uk/large-propane-gas-bottles-uk-calor-propane-gas-47kgs-best-prices where the price of a 47kg bottle is 54.18 in my area.
If I had, say, a gas cooker hob how long might I run it full tilt during the day on 47kg? Say 10 hours a day.
MM
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On 18/12/2010 10:34, MM wrote:

http://www.coals2u.co.uk/large-propane-gas-bottles-uk-calor-propane-gas-47kgs-best-prices
A 19 kg bottle lasts me 5 months just for cooking on a hob. I do lots of cooking but it isn't used on average for more than 60 mins a day, with one to three burners in use. Using a *very* rough guesstimate, if on 10 hours a day with one big burner in use, you might get two months. Don't hold me to that though. The data about my use is correct, so you can do your own calculations.
Also you'd get a lot of condensation unless you had an extractor fan which had an external outlet.
Peter Scott
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 11:59:27 +0000, Peter Scott

Harry mentioned condensation, too. Something I hadn't considered at all, actually.
Now, in terms of cost, I could: - have the oil CH working most of the day with all radiators except the kitchen (which is mainly where I spend the winter) turned down to frost protection only
- use an oil-filled electric radiator (variable 800W to 2000W) as I presently do
- use an external propane red bottle to power the gas hob
At present, the hob is electric (wipe-clean flat-surface type)
Which one of those scenarios appeals? NB: Take into account the current enormous rise in heating oil price, which might not drop for several months.
MM
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In article

Ha, this is a very good point. We've got a miserable 1200 lt and will be faced with an expensive fill in January. Next stop a 3000 lt tank, methinks.
--
Tim

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Yes that would be a sensible option if you can eliminate the risk of theft. 2000+ worth of black gold sitting in a big tank in your garden is an open invitation. It would take minutes for anyone equipped with a large tank on a flatbed with a pump to drain and once theirs was full they'd let the rest spill on the ground. Or they might be clever and have a sign written box van with the tank stowed away inside out of sight.
Dave
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In article

I'll see them from the upstairs window, rapidly don my Just William outfit and let fly with my peashooter and catapult.
--
Tim

"That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed,
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2010 14:28:50 -0800 (PST), Dave Starling

And there's no point having a lockable cap, because they just punch a hole in the tank.
MM
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No you need to do what Chubb used to do when I worked there.. run a continuous length of thin, weak wire in a snake pattern all over the surface yo want to protect and run the alarms anti-tamper circuit through it. Any attempt to get through breaks the wire and sounds the alarm. You will probably have to glue the cable to the tank or use the lead foil strips that you see on shops. The foil is easy to attach using varnish.
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Well, that sounds interesting in principle, but it's a large area to cover with thin wire and I'd hate to have to find a break in it because Mr Blackbird chased Mrs Blackbird all over the top of the thing.
--
Tim

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Its a compromise, you need it to be robust enough to not break under normal use and to break under stress. I doubt a bird would break a wire glued to the surface, squirrels are a different game.
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2010 11:59:58 -0000, "dennis@home"

I think what is needed is a strong metal spiked fence all around the tank, 2 feet away from the tank. After all, by making it more difficult at one tank, the thieves will choose elsewhere. Tough on the neighbours I know, but it's worth several hundred quid as a one-off to protect 1500's worth of oil.
MM
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That would be amusingly difficult on a modern bunded tank.
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%steve%@malloc.co.uk (Steve Firth) wrote:

Can't they just cut a hole in the outer and then screw a tap into the inner (I don't know enough about the tanks yet to know whether this is rubbish or not).
--
Tim

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Tim Streater wrote:

Local NFU man suggested says they heat up a scaffold pole and poke it through both layers of a plastic tank, leaving the excess to drain to ground.
AJH
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wrote:

Why bother when you can cut the feed pipe?
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On 18/12/2010 12:54, MM wrote:

We have an external propane red bottle (two actually) to power our gas hob instead of electric, but that's just because we find a gas hob nicer to use, nothing to do with heating the house and price of oil.
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2010 01:19:38 +0000, Clive George

Well, yes, that was what motivated my neighbour to change and what initially interested me, too, since I also hate cooking on an electric hob. An electric oven is fine, but gas rings are so much more controllable for everything else. However, in Flackwell Heath, my previous demesne, the gas hob was very useful for quickly spreading warmth throughout the kitchen on very cold days.
MM
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On 19/12/2010 10:34, MM wrote:

We have 2 13kg bottles on an automatic changeover, one lasts about 6 months, and we can easily swap them ourselves. (I think a 47kg cylinder would fail on the last point.). It's a fairly easy job to install a setup like that (flexible 10mm-ish copper, ours was done in one run, though the cylinders are just outside the kitchen), there's no worries about gas boards looking at your installation and condemning it, so if you're at all competent I'd say do it.
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We have 2 x 47kg propane on an automatic changeover valve. I fitted the hob and valve myself - it's reasonably easy if you're competent with copper plumbing. I thoroughly leak tested the whole thing - I don't care what the law says but I care very much about being blown up. 47kg of propane lasts about a year; we're keen cooks so the hob gets used every day. As for changing the bottles, the bloke who brings the gas does that, although I can move them by rolling them on their bases. The gas man can pick them up!
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On 19/12/2010 12:04, Huge wrote:

I leak tested mine - it's a pretty obvious thing to do. Unfortunately the builders doing the extension didn't test the cut/join they did :-(. Replaced the ill-sized compression fitting they tried to use with a proper solder one, and all is good again.
One nice thing about a propane cylinder is on a quiet night you can hear it boiling gently when gas is coming out, even if just through a leak.
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