Flat Roof- that old nightmare again

Fairly recently moved into 1930's house with flat roof extension covered in patches of orange moss and other ugly "colly-wobbles", plus what are obviously cracks in felt. Don't think its leaking (hard to tell - polystyrene tiles on ceiling below it - removing of which is another DIY job to come!). However it looks to be on last legs. Last owners said it has not been touched for 15 years! At time of purchase we were quoted 2800 to replace it like for like (felt)inc replacing wood underneath etc as it will probably need that too. (Got contribution to this off asking price but no where near all of it. Given what has been said before about flat roofs sinking and leaking etc do you think I would be better having it pitched? What are the regulations for doing that? Would it be very expensive and would I need planning permission? Has anyone tried the new liquid type pour on surfaces that are being hyped at the moment and are they expensive/do they work? All advice greatfully received. I have NO IDEA!
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On 23 Sep 2005 08:43:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@dsl.pipex.com wrote:

I had a flat roof, I got to 2 options
1) cover in a single piece of rubber, sthe same stuff the make fish pond liners with, 2) put a point on it, and put a room in the point.
Also worth considering is fiberglass. The rubber and fibreglass will last say 25 years, felt 5-8, maybe a bit more if luck is on your side.
The biggest factor in success is who does it, is the guy one brillinat roofer, or a joker .....
I went for 2.
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Rick wrote:

Will is the word. If its working ok now, theres no need to do anything.

of course, far longer lasting. 100 year life vs 10-20, but its more up front cost.

depends how you do it, and whether you diy it or not. And how big it is.

what does that mean?
NT
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Sorry - don't understand -why would DIY-ing mean it needed different regulations?
Also the "flat" roof is on a single extension at the back of my house - increasing kitchen and dining room. If I "put a point on it" it would go past the up stairs back bedroom windows! :)
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On 23 Sep 2005 10:05:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@dsl.pipex.com wrote:

You only need 20 or so degress slope to put tiles on, IF you choose the right tiles, you may be able to slope it away from the house.
Rick
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Rick wrote:

    17.5deg with Redland laid on tiles.
    Regards     Capitol
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Capitol wrote:

What would be the minimum slope for slate substitute type tile?
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snipped-for-privacy@dsl.pipex.com wrote:

it doesnt, it affects the cost.

often the way. A very shallow pitch can sometimes make it work.
You can go as shallow as you like with tiles or slates if you have something underneath them that will direct the rain out in high winds. Then you can ignore all the usual pitch specs. Asbestos sheet is or was ideal for this, but is no longer permitted. I imagine this could be done with fibreglass, lead, copper etc, but havent tried it with those.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com says...

You need some pitch before the tiles are even level, with less they will drain in the wrong direction.

If you want a permanently wet flat roof because the tiles direct water onto it then stop it from drying.

Since when did asbestos sheet work as roofing when laid dead flat?

If you had a lead or copper roof that cost you loads, would you want to cover it with anything?
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A *properly* made 'flat' roof with three layer felt where there is an adequate lie to drain off the water should easily do 25 years. Unfortunately they are often considered the cheap initial cost option and not made correctly.
--
*If at first you do succeed, try not to look too astonished.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote in message wrote:

How is your illegal lean-to roofed?
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*Demand* your medication now. You should be tucked up in bed with your condition.
--
*Never miss a good chance to shut up *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote in message wrote:

<snip more inane babble.
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wrote:

You'd be very lucky to have a maintenance free felt flat roof for 25 years, whether properly layed or not.
Which would explain why you would never get a 25 year guarantee with one any where.
Perhaps a heavily shaded and sheltered felt flat roof might achieve it, but it would be an exception.
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On 23 Sep 2005 08:43:10 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@dsl.pipex.com wrote:
| Fairly recently moved into 1930's house with flat roof extension | covered in patches of orange moss and other ugly "colly-wobbles", plus | what are obviously cracks in felt. Don't think its leaking (hard to | tell - polystyrene tiles on ceiling below it - removing of which is | another DIY job to come!). However it looks to be on last legs. Last | owners said it has not been touched for 15 years! At time of purchase | we were quoted 2800 to replace it like for like (felt)inc replacing | wood underneath etc as it will probably need that too. (Got | contribution to this off asking price but no where near all of it. | Given what has been said before about flat roofs sinking and leaking | etc do you think I would be better having it pitched? What are the | regulations for doing that? Would it be very expensive and would I | need planning permission?
Repairs do not need planning permission.
| Has anyone tried the new liquid type pour on | surfaces that are being hyped at the moment and are they expensive/do | they work? All advice greatfully received. I have NO IDEA!
Flat roofs now have to have IIRC a 1:50 slope, Suggest you measure the slope, they made them *flat* in the dim and distant past. If it is less than 1:50 ish it may be better to go for a pitched roof.
I have re-felted a flat roof with cold bitumen and roofing felt, no great problems, except for the mess.
--
Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk>
The London suicide bombers killed innocent commuters.
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Fairly recently moved into 1930's house with flat roof extension covered in patches of orange moss and other ugly "colly-wobbles", plus what are obviously cracks in felt. Don't think its leaking (hard to tell - polystyrene tiles on ceiling below it - removing of which is another DIY job to come!). However it looks to be on last legs. Last owners said it has not been touched for 15 years! At time of purchase we were quoted 2800 to replace it like for like (felt)inc replacing wood underneath etc as it will probably need that too. (Got contribution to this off asking price but no where near all of it. Given what has been said before about flat roofs sinking and leaking etc do you think I would be better having it pitched? What are the regulations for doing that? Would it be very expensive and would I need planning permission? Has anyone tried the new liquid type pour on surfaces that are being hyped at the moment and are they expensive/do they work? All advice greatfully received. I have NO IDEA!
If you are staying there you have 2 options, Keep it flat and lead it or pitch roof it I was going to have the lead done but have now decided to have it done 'properly' the quote was 2200 iirc with a brick gable end
Regards Jeff
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snipped-for-privacy@dsl.pipex.com says...

GRP works well on flat roofs and isn't particularly expensive.
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Fairly recently moved into 1930's house with flat roof extension covered in patches of orange moss and other ugly "colly-wobbles", plus what are obviously cracks in felt. Don't think its leaking (hard to tell - polystyrene tiles on ceiling below it - removing of which is another DIY job to come!). However it looks to be on last legs. Last owners said it has not been touched for 15 years! At time of purchase we were quoted 2800 to replace it like for like (felt)inc replacing wood underneath etc as it will probably need that too. (Got contribution to this off asking price but no where near all of it. Given what has been said before about flat roofs sinking and leaking etc do you think I would be better having it pitched? What are the regulations for doing that? Would it be very expensive and would I need planning permission? Has anyone tried the new liquid type pour on surfaces that are being hyped at the moment and are they expensive/do they work? All advice greatfully received. I have NO IDEA!
Get a quote from these people...
http://www.rooftec.co.uk /
We had ours done for roughly the same price as felt rubbish but with the added bonus of it's sorted for life.
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RedOnRed wrote:

"The average lifespan of a normal flat felted roof is approximately seven years."
- from their website. IME/O that's absolute rubbish.
"With Rooftec however, you can look forward to at least 50 years of trouble-free performance - and we back this with a watertight guarantee."
I have heard it's hard to get action taken under guarantee from various firms. I wonder whether thas will happen with this one? I've a bit of fibreglassed plywood in the garden that's about 25 yrs. old, & it looks rough. I hope this product lasts longer!
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