Filling holes in doors after removing Yale surface locks

I am in a house that had been bedsitter-ized. I've converted it back to a family house and the final job is to take off the Yale surface locks that had been put on 4 of the interior doors. The holes for the barrels appear to have been drilled with one of those spade-type wood bits, so although not bad are not going to be a good fit to a wood plug, and I don't have a lathe too fashion suitable plugs. The holes about 32 mm dia., and are centred 40mm from the edge
I do have a router, and routing out the holes to clean them up seems straight-forward, but that leaves me with the problem of making/obtaining suitable dowels to fill them. Also, using dowels will leave me with end-grain which although not ideal is tolerable if they are to be painted.
Possibly a better option is to convert the round holes to rectangular (possibly routed with rounded corners, or the corners then squared up with a chisel?) and fashion rectangular blocks to suit with the face grain matching the door grain (in direction at least), That would give a future option of stripping the existing door paint and staining instead.
Any ideas on making router templates to (a) clean up the existing holes and produce good fitting dowel plugs? or (b) ditto but with squaring the holes and making matching plugs?
Or should I start with sourcing some slightly oversize 32mm diameter dowel, then router the holes to match?
Phil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 00:54, Phil Addison wrote:

You can use a router with a template and the right set of bushes[1] to cut a recess in the door, and then an exactly matching plug from some other timber. This will let you route out the imperfection and replace it with a patch made from a suitable (matching) bit of timber. Glue it in place, and sand flush.
(you can leave the lock hole under the patch empty, or fill it before covering with the plate).
[1] Trend do a set - its basically an oval template (however you can use any shape you want), a 20mm guide bush, a 10mm cutter, and a 40mm sleeve that goes over the bush. You fit the bush and the sleeve, clamp the template, and route the surface to cut the pocket. Then remove the sleeve and route with the same template on your donor material just using the bush on its own. The removal of the sleeve changes the offset of the cutter to make perfectly matched parts.
https://www.trend-uk.com/en/UK/product/TEMP_TRKX1_4/4/185/template_timber_repair_kit_.html
Manual explaining process here:
https://www.trend-uk.com/en/UK/trend/content/download_file.php?file=aW5zdF90ZW1wX3Rya3gxLTQucGRm
Axminster sell the collars separately if you already have a suitable guide bush:
https://www.axminstertools.com/trend-guide-bush-collar-to-fit-gb793-500273
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks John, that looks the business. The Trend oval template is possibly a bit larger than I need so might try to make my own. I can see the oval idea might make for a less visible repair, but do you see any snags with a circular one, just slightly larger than the hole that needs filling?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 14:47, Phil Addison wrote:

Yup you can make any size / shape template you like so long as it has no radius that is smaller than that of your largest guide bush.

That's fine. The attraction of a non round one is making the lines less easy to see. This matters not much on a painted door, but if trying to do a near invisible repair on a polished hardwood it can make more of adifference.
In reality if you already have a guide bush, then you can make the rest. Pick a cutter, and then make a ring of wood (or whatever) to go round it, and sand it down[1] so that the offset it introduces is exactly twice the diameter of the chosen cutter. Make a template and sand/file smooth on the internal edges.
[1] To sand something circular to an exact diameter with perfect centering of the hole, I would take a scrap of ply/mdf and double sided tape the router bush to it nearish the edge. Drill a hole though the add on bush, and fettle until its a nice snug fit on the bush. Then you can offer the whole thing up to a rotating disc sander (or any other type really), and spin it round the bush to sand the outer edge. Better to under rather than over do, you can always take more off.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phil Addison expressed precisely :

Could you perhaps fit decorative finger plates instead, over the holes?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nice lateral thinking but I really want a proper job ;)
And there are already nice finger plates, but these locks are 4" above them so would make them unnaturally high.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, 19 May 2020 14:51:28 UTC+1, Phil Addison wrote:

If you have a router you could make nice really long wood finger plates that would go up most of the stile of the door - then mount your decorative plates over those at the usual height.
Even make 4 plates for each side of the door - hinge and latch side, top and bottom - and they will look like fancy mouldings if stained/painted to match the door.
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phil Addison wrote:

holesaw?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at 7:54:40 AM UTC+1, Andy Burns wrote:

You might try stuffing the hole with tightly packed newspaper and levelling it flush with a suitable filler.
Or blanking off one side of the hole and injecting some foam filler which could be cut or routered flush after it had expanded. Some spackle should level the surface of the foam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 07:54, Andy Burns wrote:

That was how I cut a plug for a Yale lock hole when I needed to fill it. You still have a small hole in the centre from the pilot drill, but wood filler is fine for that.
--
Colin Bignell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 09:10, nightjar wrote:

If you need to use a holesaw without the pilot bit, first drill a hole through a scrap bit of ply in the normal way, then remove the pilot bit, clamp the scrap plywood where you want your real hole, and use it to guide the now "pilotless" hole saw.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 00:54, Phil Addison wrote:

On old painted doors I have just roughly filled the hole with a piece(s) of wood glued in with Polyurethane glue which foams, then chiselled excess off, surface filler, sand and paint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 19 May 2020 09:46:04 +0100, Robert wrote:

That would have been my suggestion. Gorilla Glue or similar.
--
My posts are my copyright and if @diy_forums or Home Owners' Hub
wish to copy them they can pay me £1 a message.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 00:54, Phil Addison wrote:

Either use a router jig (as suggested by JR) or just use your chisels to cut a shallow rectangular rebate and inset a piece of matching timber with the grain aligned with that of the door. There's no need to fill the hole. Alternatively, if you don't mind end grain, it's fairly easy to make dowels of any size. For small dowels I would drill a series of (decreasing size) holes in a bit of gash steel, file a notch in the edge of the hole and either hammer or spin (with a drill) through the holes until you reach the size you want. For larger dowels you can either make a simple router jig or use a sharp chisel to make a big pencil sharpener - loads of examples on t'web. I would just use a sharp chisel to cut a rebate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 19 May 2020 12:32:08 +0100, in uk.d-i-y snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Good point.

I don't get this, can you clarify? The required dowels are around 32 mm diameter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 15:00, Phil Addison wrote:

The search string isn't difficult, "making large dowels" should work. Square or octagonal stock fed through a hole in a block that has a router bit running inside (perpendicular to stock and offset) and an exit hole the desired size - turn stock whilst feeding in. Requires rough sums to start with and then some trial and error but makes reasonable dowels, any size you want. You could probably do something similar on a saw table but I haven't tried.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 19 May 2020 19:01:12 +0100, in uk.d-i-y snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

OK, got it thanks. Copying the search results url isn't difficult either. https://www.google.com/search?q=making+large+dowels Very interesting vids, e.g. the 1st one
https://youtu.be/edHwDH5dbX0

https://youtu.be/edHwDH5dbX0

Phil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Better looking results with a chisel, rather than a router?
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1Az_wrxn78

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 19:01, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Check out some of Izzy Swan's crazy table saw jigs. e.g:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fp5n7SpzGLE

(same idea can be done with a router table as well)
or bowling balls:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFf6FLXDQcU

:-)
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/05/2020 19:52, John Rumm wrote:

Brilliant! I wish I'd had the balls to try that ;-)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.