Exterior door problem

The door is "beaching" on what must be a slight rise in level in the tiled floor in the porch behind it, which coincides with the outside sweep of the door as it opens.
The bit of the (exterior)door that is now scuffing the tiles is actually a triangular-section timber nose that is attached across the bottom outside edge of the door to improve weathering. This has probably been in place since the house was built (c. 1905). The door is a large one compared to what's typical today, and it's heavy, so I want to take a millimetre or two off the area that's causing the problem, but I want to do it without removing the door.
Other than the obvious angle grinder, is there an easy way to do this?
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. I remember Appelation Controlee

With the non-removal of the door in mind, I'd think about running a hacksaw blade along the bottom, in a padsaw handle. Can't you take the triangular drip section off, to work on it?
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On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 13:36:09 +0000, Grimly Curmudgeon

Or try a strip of very coarse sandpaper fed under the door and rubbed backwards and forwards ...I did this once and used a piece of floor sanding stuff that had been left behind .
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On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 13:47:05 +0000, Usenet Nutter wrote:

Thanks for the suggestions - I already tried sandpaper, but much to-ing and fro-ing resulted in little change. The timber strip is quite subsantial, and it's unlikely it could be removed without destroying it. It's as much part of the door as the mouldings surrounding the panels. I'll try the hacksaw blade and let you know.
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On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 14:37:47 +0000, Appelation Controlee
snipped

I found you had to do it in a specific way for it to work .The sandpaper has to be long enough for you to have a good grip on it so you can exert an upwards force with one hand on each side of the door .and using a "one side up/other side down" motion ...as I said the stuff I used was part of a floor sanding belt which has a fabric backing and doesn't tear .....I think I also tried a blade but found the trouble with that was it kept bending away from the undersurface of the door .
Another alternative is a device specifically made for cutting slices off bottoms of doors in-situ ...cant remember what they are called .
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Appelation Controlee wrote:

Difficult to get to both ends without taking the door off. Then you could just use a circular saw and be guaranteed a nice straight cut.
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Have the hinges dropped?
If they have it may be better to take the door off and replace the hinges which will avoid having to hack the bottom of the door.
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On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 13:10:37 -0800 (PST), js.b1 wrote:

No the hinges are OK. In practice the hacksaw blade has done the trick. I cut away about 3mm depth, which was the least I could achieve, for roughly 75mm inwards from the outside edge of the door. The nosing is set slightly lower than the bottom edge of the door, which would have made working an abrasive strip (in the manner suggested by Mr Nutter) a bit difficult.
Thanks again to all for the suggestions. :-)
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