Extending and/or splitting coax cable - what's the correct way?

Just added another TV to the collection...
I want to be able to split it between two TV's , but having moved the old TV around, the cable now doesn't reach either of the TVs.
I am looking for two possible solutions:
1. Assuming that no amplification is required (I'll have to verify this): use a 1-to-2 junction box (or similar) to split the cable under the house and run cables to both TV.
2. If the signal needs boosting: extend the cable to a point where I can fit a booster/splitter.
Whilst the space under the house offers protection from direct sun light and/or rain, it is almost the same as leaving the cable/connectors outside (very windy/cold, etc).
I would be most grateful for advice as to the correct way to split/extent the cable is what is essentially our outdoor conditions. Links to exact part will also be great.
Many thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Plugs (F-type) (10pk): http://www.screwfix.com/p/arse/17061
Barrel jointer (10pk): http://www.screwfix.com/p/arse/95730
Splitter: http://www.screwfix.com/p/arse/99105
Connector fitting instructions: http://satcure.co.uk/tech/fconn.htm
Ignore the silicon grease and taping mentions for non-outdoor use.
The plugs are basically strip, fold back braid and twist on, sounds rough but they are secure if sized correctly. Just buy some and try it, post back if you have trouble, the connection should survive quite a tug if made correctly. The coax (solid) core forms the connector pin.
Suck it and see as is and post back if you think you need a booster.
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Generally good advice except for sealing. The best way of making the joints weatherproof is to use self amalgamating tape. Properly applied it will last for at least twenty years. You can get the tape from Screwfix product code 87717.
Peter Crosland
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Read again . . . .
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/01/2012 14:38, fred wrote:

Thanks a lot for that - just the answer I was hoping for as I already have the f-type fittings from another job...
Just out of interest - what does "power pass to all ports" mean?
Also, is there any interference issue with running the coax cable alongside CAT5e cables? I am only talking about 2m or so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/01/2012 16:54, JoeJoe wrote:

Masthead aerial amplifiers etc require power to operate. Usually the power supply for these is kept in the house, and the power is fed up the co-ax to the masthead amp. Hence if you have something like this being powered from the co-ax, anything you place in the co-ax along the way must also pass the power through. Some splitters only do so on one particular port - hence in those cases you need to take care to put the outgoing lead with the PSU on it, on the right socket of the splitter.
Ones with power pass on all ports does not have this restriction.

Not usually any problem.
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Rumm wrote:

But may incorporate diodes so DC doesn't pass from port to port. But that stops you using the splitter 'backwards' with LP.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/01/2012 19:18, Bill Wright wrote:

Funny you should say that, but I wondered to myself if they various ports are isolated from each other as I typed that ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Snap!
Screwfix used to do the single power port version (Labgear WBS2F) at silly cheap prices so I got my few examples there. Current offering appears to be Labgear FBS402, note the directional power feed arrows on case pic suggesting diodes as per Bill's post (Ta).
For comedy effect it appears that the current version of WBS2F has the power port on the right whereas mine have it on the left. Nothing like continuity of design eh?
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
fred wrote:

A while back we needed some that would pass 24VDC from one port to the 'input' and the other port. It was easy to short out the diodes. This was with some CPC ones designed for satellite IF.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/01/2012 17:12, John Rumm wrote:

Thanks again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/01/2012 14:38, fred wrote:

Spent an hour under the house today and connected everything:
Cable from aerial (on roof) to splitter - around 15-20m - as before adding the splitter. - SF didn't have the one you suggested, so I bought this one instead - http://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-professional-splitter-6-way/48074 . - Connected TV that was originally connected to the aerial cable to splitter - signal dropped from 100% to 99%. - Connected second TV to splitter - cable around 10-15m. Signal only 9%... :-(. Amazingly all the channels seem to work OK, including the TV guide. Only BBC channels are pixelated and unwatchable (and show 7%).
Any idea how to improve before I go down the amplification route?
PS: Used F-type plugs, wall plates, and good quality cable, so don't think there is a problem there?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thirty-six wrote:

No, that sort of pratting about is a waste of time. Signal levels are generally too low. But a one input one output mains powered amp, gain around 12dB, fit it on the aerial feed, as close to the aerial as possible, but right next to the splitter if that's the best you can do.
Blake Proception PROAMP 11 is ideal. http://www.blake-uk.com/proamp.aspx
Better still, if you can get to the aerial fit a 16dB masthead amp. Proception, Vision, Labgear, Antiference.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/01/2012 01:50, Bill Wright wrote:

Very difficult to reach the aerial - 15m high on gable end on a hill side...
It is also going to be difficult to provide power near the bottom of the aerial.
Is there any point in amplifying the signal just before the cable is connected to the far-away TV?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JoeJoe wrote:

Not really. A marginal improvement might, at best, be obtained. It certainly doesn't address the problem. If you can get power to the splitter position put the mains powered amp just before the splitter.
If not, use a masthead amp with a separate mains power unit. The 12V DC goes up the coax. The problem is that the amp still needs to be before the splitter (this is vital), but the splitter might not pass the DC power. Does the splitter have 'DC pass' written on it,
http://cpc.farnell.com/labgear/fbs138/splitter-8-way-power-pass/dp/AP02113 http://cpc.farnell.com/unbranded/fbs138/f-type-splitter-8-way/dp/AP00308
You could actually use a non DC splitter and bypass it for DC by the use of two of these: http://cpc.farnell.com/unbranded/a1330/line-power-inserter/dp/SE00411 but it's rather a faff.
Alternatively
http://cpc.farnell.com/labgear/pum141-psm114/10db-masthead-amplifier-kit/dp/AP01495 http://cpc.farnell.com/labgear/pum141/amplifier-masthead-4way/dp/AP01340
followed by a few two-way splitters on the non-powered legs to give enough outputs (split the shortest feeds).
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not usually, but might be worth a go if you have low noise levels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, problem is that the incoming signal power is split by the number of ways on the splitter, irrespective of the number of loads connected. Thus a 6 way splitter will reduce signal power to 17% vs the 50% avail on the proposed 2W splitter.

That sounds ok.

Something is wrong here, 15m of cable is not that great a loss so I wouldn't expect it to go over the edge from 99% to duff with just that. Check for stray hairs of braid that might be shorting the signal (no it doesn't always result in no signal).

If you don't need all those ways off the splitter then find a 2W splitter of the same quality (F-conns, soldered cab construction eg. Labgear) as the signal will be 3 times stronger from that alone
If you need lots of splits then you will need a distribution amp.

If you have spare cable, make up a long fly lead to temporarily replace your long installed section to see if it works ok. Was it really good cable (copper foil and braid screening)? No kinks in the cable (easily done in a back box)?
If you find you need an amp (after trying the 2W splitter alone and a replacement cable) then those suggested by Bill will be good as this is his expert topic.
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ask at uk.rec.digital-tv if you get no responses here or want more details than this.
Sounds like you need a passive TV splitter - most seem to go for those either connecting directly to the cable or using F-connectors instead of the Belling plugs (the type that plugs into the TV). They have components inside to stop reflections etc and are NOT the same as splicing the cables in a simple Y (despite what many cowboys seem to think). TV cable is also supposed to be weather proof so no issues there.
Also, if you need a boost, boost as close to the aerial as possible otherwise you're also boosting any noise which has crept in along the cable.
Paul DS.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JoeJoe wrote:

A way that works to extend cables without TOO much impedance change is to strip them back and get the outer sheaths out of the way and lap solder the smallest amount of the inners you can get away with together and, if you are careful, push the insulation over that joint so the dielectric is more or less continuous, then tape that up with a bit of PVC tape and connect the outers in some way. Brass shim or tinplate cut from a mustard tin wrapped round the cable (or tube slid over it) will preserve the outer continuity and geometry. Solder the braids to that.
Then wrap the lot in self amalgamating tape.
Its probably no worse than a custom connector, electrically, and is more proof against environmentally induced deterioration.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 14:42:08 +0000, The Natural Philosopher

Thanks, but I'll continue to use two plugs and a barrel if you don't mind.
--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.