Exemption from building regs???

Hi please see below: I dont know how to post updates to old messages
The below is true but I have been looking into this and I dont need Planning Permission as its less than 1/2 size of property, more than 5 meters from house and not higher than 3 meters from highest point of ground as the garden is split layer.
So i am wondering if i can get around Building regs if i decrease the scale so thats it 7x4 meters (under 30m2) and build it of non combustabile materials as it closer than 1 meter to boundary. This under schedule 2 of building regs means its exempt BUT its is a two storie buidling and I have a nasty feeling this will mean building regs are required and therefore we could revert back to the original sizes??
Another idea was to build a single layer building on the lower level exepmt of PP and regs but then place a large log cabin on the top effectively giving a two storie would this work??
Regards
Anthony
All messages from thread Message 1 in thread From: antz ( snipped-for-privacy@lycos.co.uk) Subject: Building a two story garden building! View this article only Newsgroups: uk.d-i-y Date: 2004-08-23 04:12:12 PST
Hello
I am looking for some advice on building a garden building! I have read the threads about garden offices but this is on a larger scale!!!
We have a large garden that is split on two layers with the top garden (the smallest) extending from the house.
we are hoping for a brick/block built building measuring about 7m x 12m. For this the top garden will be dug down to the level of the bottom garden and the foundations will be placed! The building will be on two levels with the bottom being a garden shed / bike shed /workshop and the upper layer being a gamesroom/ bar/ gym.
what would be the best way to get this project going? I have never been though this process. do i commision an architec? or just get some outline plans drawn (by who) and submit these to the local planning office?
cheers
anthony Message 2 in thread From: dg ( snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com) Subject: Re: Building a two story garden building! View this article only Newsgroups: uk.d-i-y Date: 2004-08-23 13:37:58 PST
You want a 'designer' to prepare plans for [possibly] Planning Approval, and for Buiding Regulation Approval too. Also consider that the plans should be suitably detailed and specified to include internal fit out and finishes.
The designer can be an Architect, or architectural technician, Building Surveyor or Building Engineer.
An Architect will cost you much more money, but will possibly have more 'artistic' ideas. If its just a basic building then use someone from the other professions. An Architect may charge upto 10% of the project cost
Also consider using the designer to project manage the work if you don't want to deal with the builders.
Essentially the designer should: note your requirements assess the site prepare some preliminary designs for your agreement finalise a design (what you want/what you can have) and submit for approval Prepare full working drawings for building. Give a rough cost estimate
Also be aware that the designer should be suitablly experienced to know that what he designs will stand a good chance of being approved by the local Planning dept. Agree an inclusive fee for getting any required approval.
dg
Message 3 in thread From: N. Thornton ( snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk) Subject: Re: Building a two story garden building! snipped-for-privacy@lycos.co.uk (antz) wrote in message
i think youll find you need PP for a house.
NT
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But what is the cubic volume of it, compared to the original house? Are there previous extensions/conservatories etc. Is it in a conservation area and were the permitted development rights withheld when the property was built (many estate locations would be built with permitted development withdrawn).
Christian.
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It may be exempt from the planning process (though I think not) but it's never exempt from the building regulations.
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Anything with a floor that is meant to take the loading of a habitable area needs planning and building permission in all parts of the UK. When you start to rise up to a second floor you need structural design drawings for load bearing walls and roof structures as well. If you want to put drainage and water supplies in to it, you meet further regulations and requirements. So you're better starting with a planned drawing and detailed build structure notice, and submit all this to your local councils appropriate departments, and work your way out from there.
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On 13 Jan 2005 13:09:09 -0800, a particular chimpanzee named snipped-for-privacy@lycos.co.uk (antz) randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

To be exempt any small building not containing sleeping accommodation needs to be detached, single storey, have a floor area of less than 30mē and either be substantially non-combustible or more than 1.0m from a boundary. As your proposal is two storeys, it's not exempt.
If you added another storey onto an existing single storey building, this would make the whole thing non-exempt, and you would need to expose the foundations and supporting structure.
--
Hugo Nebula
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