Drilling floor tiles

For my future reference, can anyone suggest a proven method of drilling holes in unfixed and/or fixed floor tiles? The wall tiles are easy enough to drill with a normal masonry bit although I did buy a "proper" tile drill (more later...)
The problem was drilling the floor tiles. I tried several methods...
1) Bit of making tape over "proposed hole". Tap "X" with sharp screw to chip surface. Drill gently with masonsy drill on slow speed. Result: Chewed up masking tape and no hole.
2) Drill more vigorously with masonsy drill on slow speed. Result: No hole but wearing through tile surface slowly.
3) Drill with increasing vigour on highest speed. Result: No hole but wearing through tile surface less slowly.
4) Get out SDS drill and touch tile. Result: Shattered tile.
Fix tiles down and plan to drill in place. 2 days later...
5) Go to Focus and but "proper" tile drill for 4.95 Result: Que for 15 minues only to be told they won't accept a credit card for under 5. Faff about trying to find some cash in pockets as wallet at home (only brought out to pay account at BM) Found cash, bought drill, vowed never to return.
6) Mark up new tile. Start drilling hole, slow then high speed with proper tile drill. Result: Tile drill "lightly marks" surface and glows red as which point I stopped.
Repeat steps 2 and 3 for around 30 minutes.
7) Grab angle grinder and try and think of how to drill a hole with a 9" diamond blade? Result: Tea
8) Drill on slow speed with "proper" tiles drill using cold tea as a lubricant. Result: Drill bill snatches and shatters but does drill into the tile by about 3mm.
9) Spend another 30 mins drilling remainder of hole with a newer masonry bit on slow speed. Result: Approximate hole.
10) Repeat above (minus tile drill) for another 4 holes!!!! Result: Go home, drink alcohol and post to NG.
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snipped-for-privacy@bobsplace.org says... <snip>

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TonyK wrote:

Once did that. Considered buyin diamond drill but v. expensive (£30+ as I remember) Decided to make square cut out with tile saw and fill in round/square gap with grout.
--
David Clark

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    Buy tile drill set from Toolstation, they don't shatter like the Screwfix one's do. However, they do lose their edge if they are allowed to overheat, but can be sharpened with a quick touch up on a diamond wheel. If you need a larger dia hole, then resharpening a normal masonry drill to a shape similar to the tile drills with the diamond wheel can be worth while.
    Regards     Capitol
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to
chip
vowed
I'm planning on drilling a hole this weekend in newly laid tiles. When you say floor tiles, do you mean the thick red earthenware style tile or do you mean the floor tiles that look almost identical to wall tiles?
Rory
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Hmmm, I suspect I've been lucky. As much as I hate to admit buying them, I found the "Bullet" bits to be damn good for this job. I just used a standard drill, set to a low speed and ensure that the hammer setting is off. I start very slowly until the drill has 'bit' and then I increase the speed slightly and apply quite a hard pressure. If at any time I think the drill bit is getting too hot then I just back off (go for a cuppa) and then start again.
The life of the "Bullet" bits when used this way isn't great, but they're not that expensive....
Seri
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