diy replacement of ch oil tank

Can anyone kindly outline a diy procedure for replacing a weeping black plastic 'piggy' tank [Titan approx 1200l.] with one of similar size and disposing of the old. Existing tank feeds a ch boiler in cellar and an Aga in kitchen - will we inevitably get air in system when swapping tanks or can this be avoided ? Have been quoted megabucks by local plumbing firm for this job, hence contemplated diy. AFAIK existing siting would comply with current regs.
TIA
David
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snipped-for-privacy@AOL.COM wrote:

You are going to have to drain it so you will be getting close to a problem if you drain it by using it up. Sorry I know nothing of such systems. Just posting to give the message a bump.
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Replacing the tank is simple enough to do. Empty, diconnect (yes, you will get air in), man handle old one away and replace with new one, then reconnect, refill with the saved oil, recommission boiler and aga and job done. If you are lucky the air will not be a problem at all. If unlucky then you will need to bleed the system which is not diffiult. If really unlucky you will need a full tank of oil to get sufficient head to clear the air locks.
The job is not really that difficult except:
- need pump and containers to pump oil out into
- need to know why the old one leaker - is the base unsuitable
- should comply with OFTEC rules for the tank location etc (which it sounds like it does)
- an ideal time to design out weakpoints by careful choice of filter, isolation valve and level guage
- need to dispose of old tank.
Why not get some more quotes - it is an easy job for someone set up to do this. Try asking your oil supplier who they would recommend.
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Unless the tank is nearly empty, I think that that is your biggest problem! I collected old plastic drums from local garages.

I would have thought that you could have cut up a plastic tank quite easily
If the boiler is lower than the tank then air locks should not be a problem. Very little air will get into the pipe if you don't disconnect the boiler end.
If there is air in the pipe the boiler will just lock out and you will have to restart it - maybe a few times. ( I don't know about Agas.)
If it was me I would install a larger tank. I think that you can go to 2500 litres before you have to start bothering about bunding. See Oftec web site.

Alternatively look in yellow pages for oil boiler install/maintenance - if you don't already know one. Likely you neighbours also use oil and could recommend someone.
--

Michael Chare






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When I had to replace a steel tank, years ago now, I used a specialist firm. Someone like this :
http://www.tankservices.co.uk/domestic.html
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snipped-for-privacy@AOL.COM wrote:

If its weeping from the outlet fitting or perhaps the drain plug it may well be that you only need to unscrew the guilty one and redo it with a good dressing of ptfe tape.
if the tank has a pin hole that makes it weep that too can be repaired if you can reach to the inside.
I would try to repair it as its only a weep rather than a break.
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snipped-for-privacy@AOL.COM wrote:

in principal this is an easy job, but - presuming that a tank that is leaking has been in a good few years - you will not be able to (or should not) exactly copy the existing set up.
The building regs & all sorts of jobsworth became interested in oil tanks from around 2001 & regs are slowly being tightened up.
Just a few points:
Check out the building regs. Try to understand how a new installation would be designed in 2006, even if you aren't going to exactly do that. Possibly talk to your Building Control dept once you have a firm understanding of what is needed & what you intend to do. Be wary what you say you are going to do or you may get stuck paying +++++ fee them. Just ask questions: maybe best if you don't say where you live or who you are. They can't charge for questions.
Many (& if it isn't ALL by now - it soon will IMHO) tanks are required to be bunded - ie they have to have a double skin to reduce leakage spills.
Tank siting may have to be changed to meet current regs regarding distance from house openings etc.
A hard concrete tank base may be needed. Prior to 2001 SFAIUI you could place them on any firm ground.
Old steel tanks were usually raised off the ground at an angle to permit sludge drainage: not needed with plastic. Nor is it usually necessary to raise tanks off the ground to give a gravity feed into the boiler as that should have enough suction power regardless.
Gate valves used to be commonly used on the fuel supply lline - avoid as they always seep after a time: use a quarter turn lever valve, but make sure it is designed/certified by the maker for kerosene.
Chances are a local fuel supplier will empty the tank for you. or wait until there's around 100litres left (ie about 80kg) - you might be able to man handle it then. Plastic tanks are quite light.
Note any attempt to move your boiler will incur the wrath of 2 (s)hags' ghost & force you to instal a new boiler (that is if your LA Building Control know - so again be wary as to what you tell them).
Your installation being (presumably) quite old, there may be several points at which BC could come down heavily on - such as your boiler being in the cellar might just possibly raise eyebrows with Building Control - I don't know, just be circumspect.
If there is any prospect that you will let your house, then it may be advisable to follow current regs closely.
Don't worry about getting air into the boiler - turn off the fuel lines in the boiler & bleed to fuel lines before reconnecting.
HTH
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Very many thanks to all who've taken the time and trouble to post such helpful info. + all these lush fruits of experience - it all does help immensely !
David
ironer wrote:

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