Diamond wheel tile cutters

Any recommendations for a diamond wheel tile cutter which must be capable of handling floor tiles. I bought a 'Challenge' cutter at Argos for £29.99 but the wheel is catching on the base of the water trough and the stick-on rulers are peeling off, therefore I haven't even attempted to use it. The device is made in China, which doesn't really instil confidence, and is marketed by Hilka. It's going back to Argos ASAP. Argos have a more expensive machine - the Pro Tiler Plus @ £39.99 - has anyone any experience of this model? Although the cutting wheel is smaller (110mm compared 180mm), it has a transparent blade guard and will handle 45 & 22.5 degree cuts and it's claimed to handle tiles up to 25mm thick. The Plasplugs models at this sort of price seem underpowered and flimsy and I would prefer all metal construction.
I realise that I would probably have to pay over £150 for a semi-professional machine, but I only want one for my kitchen floor and bathroom walls. Any advice would be appreciated as I'm now under a deadline to finish the kitchen. I would also like some advice on suitable adhesives and grout for my kitchen floor, which is now concrete as I've removed the old vinyl tiles, although some of the old black adhesive still remains (it's impossible to remove). I would prefer to use self-mix powder types.
Terry D.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry D wrote:

But they have very good quality motors, which is what really counts here. I have a 4" PlasPlugs one, which I've used for a range of tiles and stone, including some incredibly hard ceramic tiles. It has so far performed flawlessly.
There's little point in a larger blade if the sufficient torque isn't available to drive it.
As for it being flimsy, I'm not really sure what you mean.
--
Grunff

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grunff wrote:

Flimsy was perhaps a bad choice of word. On further investigation, the Pro Tiler Plus at Argos is actually a PlasPlugs model, which is not stated on the website, only in their catalogue. However, the Argos catalogue states a wheel diameter of 110mm, whereas the same machine on the Tooled-Up web-site specifies 180mm. I appreciate that this is not really important, but 70mm is quite a difference. The problem with Argos is that you can't see before buying. I guess it's back to good old B&Q if I get a refund from Argos.
Terry D.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been able to look at things before buying in Argos. Just explain what you want to do and they'll oblige.
--
simon at sbarr dot demon dot co dot uk
Simon Barr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

of
but
experience
prefer
I have only positive things to say about the plasplugs model, although I did take the first one back as bracket holding the water gaurd was bent. It has now been used to tile the porch and bathroom, with tiles from 12-15mm thickness with no problems at all.
Personally I would imagine that the overall quality of a cheap plastic version is better than a cheap metal one. At this level you need the money to have been spent in the right places, and my first priority would be the motor rather than the casing.
I don't rate the stick on rulers of the plasplugs or the tile guide, but with careful set up and use there is no problem repeatably cuting square edges, or cutting small angles where required.
cheers
David
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David wrote:

Thanks to everybody for all the useful advice - I think I'll go with the PlasPlugs Pro Tiler Plus. I would still appreciate any advice on ahesives & grout.
Terry D.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry D wrote:

This is not a particularly demanding application - so I wouldn't worry about it too much. I usually use BAL adhesive and grout, and have had good results with their products. Having said that, I've heard a few horror stories about BAL products.
--
Grunff

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

of
I lost my tile cutter (since found it again in the garden shed).
I ended up cutting my floor tiles (riven slate) freehand with a 6.99 screwfix 115mm angle grinder with a diamond disc (which cost slightly more than the grinder). It worked perfectly and was no problem getting a straight cut if you mark the lines out before hand. Excellent for cutting difficult bits, too. I don't know how it would work on ceramic tiles, but suspect it might work OK.

I've always used the best I could find. In my case that was Arduflex 7001 TS (as I was laying onto wood), although there is almost certainly several more suitable Arduflex adhesives in the range. They do grout, too.
http://www.ardex.co.uk/tileadhesives_grouts.asp
Christian.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Personally, I only use an angle grinder where I haven't got a safer tool. So hardly ever, as I'm terrified of the things. A proper wet bath diamond wheel tile cutter is near safe enough to let a child use.
--
*I have plenty of talent and vision. I just don't care.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How do you know/decide what is "the best I could find"?
--
Chris Green

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I read the technical notes and see who sounds more convincing. Most manufacturers didn't even have a specialist product for timber floors.
Christian.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I returned the Challenge tile cutter to Argos and bought the PlasPlugs Pro Tiler Plus for £10 more (£39.99). I now stand by my original comment of 'flimsy'. The whole thing appears just a piece of cheap, mostly plastic junk and weighs less than half of the Challenge sturdy all-metal constuction. The adjustments for mitre cutting are just a joke - just thin flexible lugs which are supposed to fit into moulded guides. I can see these breaking off in no time, although fortunately I won't be cutting many mitres. The ruler guides are also showing signs of unsticking themselves, as with the Challenge. The integral water reservoir however seems better than the Challenge cutter. I'll give it a go but at the first sign of trouble, it's back to Argos again. I suppose at these prices I shouldn't really complain too much, but if I paid any more I may as well employ a professional tiler. On reflection, I now wish I'd gone for vinyl flooring as I now still have to buy the adhesive & grout and also suffer the kitchen out of action for at least 24 hours :-(
Terry D.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A word of advice. It's not a hammer and chisel way of splitting tiles, but a saw. Use it gently - let the saw do the work - and it'll be fine. Of course it's not a pro tool, but it's not a pro price. And also as something which will be used infrequently, you might appreciate the light weight for storing on a top shelf, etc.
I'm normally all in favour of the best quality tools even at the price, but in this case I think you'll find the Plasplugs ok once you're used to it.
--
*Why do the two "sanction"s (noun and verb) mean opposites?*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Plowman wrote:

Thanks for the reassurance Dave. I'll get my safety goggles out and have a few practice runs this weekend. BTW, how long can I expect the blade to last in terms of cutting length?
Terry D.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry D wrote:

Big girl...

Depends a lot on what you're cutting. I've so far done 1 bathroom, one shower room and a hallway, using ceramic wall tiles and (very hard) porcelain floor tiles on the original blade. I will be replacing it before doing the kitchen floor.
--
Grunff

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a
That varies very wildly on many factors.
In particular, keeping it wet is important, so when you stop getting drenched every time you use it, the water level is too low.
Using it slowly and backing up occasionally to clear it helps.
I did my whole bathroom, including absolutely loads of mitring of some very bulky dado tiles, on about 1.2 wheels. I didn't persist on the old wheel as it started getting dangerous by hurling the tile across the room.
Christian.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You'll not need those, as all it throws out is water with some slurry in it - no chunks as you might expect with an angle grinder etc. Just make sure you set the guard as low as possible otherwise you'll get soaked - but in any case wear something that doesn't matter if it gets wet.

I'll let you know when I wear one out. It's a long time, although it will depend on what you're cutting.
--
*Could it be that "I do " is the longest sentence? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Plowman wrote:

Did you mean that I won't need the practice runs or I won't need the safety goggles? I'm astounded at the blasι attitude of some DIY enthusiasts with regard to safety. For instance, I quite often see neighbours using rotary mowers or strimmers without adequate footwear (sometimes even sandals!) and suitable eye protection. After working for ICI for 35 years, safety was instilled into me from an early age. I have goggles, steel toe-capped boots, gloves, overalls and even a hard hat, all of which are worn when deemed necessary.
Getting back to the floor-tiling - I'm already booked for tiling my daughter's new conservatory floor and I haven't even started my own kitchen yet, followed by the bathroom. :-(
BTW, what gets the vote for the most frightening DIY appliance. I think my vote must go to chain saws, closely followed by hedge trimmers.
Terry D.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 20:22:55 +0100, Terry D wrote:

Most scary chainsaw. Most dangerous stanley knife. High powered nailguns must be up there somewhere as well, you know the things that'll drive a 4" nail into solid concrete.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Liquorice wrote:

Does my spud gun count as a tool? So many near misses...
--
Grunff

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.