DAMP PROBLEMS TIPS ON MOULD CONDENSATION

ANY ADVICE NEEDED ON ALL RELATED DAMP ISSUES PLEAES CHECK OUT OUR WEB SITE
http://www.thedampdoctor.co.uk/
nhs information on mould http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/Can-damp-and-mould-affect-my-health.aspx?CategoryID
a link on my website where we have posted roughly 20 articles on damp and mould tips advice
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this is a forum for mould and damp please feel free to join in
https://www.facebook.com/thedampdoctor link to my face book page I have tons of good info on there
http://www.thedampdoctor.co.uk/
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On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 9:35:47 PM UTC, steven robinson wrote:

'We.... offering a full professional and guaranteed range of solutions for: rising damp,'
usual scam then?
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far from it
im a very honest contactor
its funny you should say that because ive been writing up something on that subject about so called rising damp
that argument is for scientists to argue about
if you have damp in your home and its damp in the walls and floor this can be very confusing half the experts say there is rising damp the other half say it does not ???? all you care about is getting it fixed we deal with all types of damp penetrating damp mould condensation it could be breeching the dpc could be a burst pipe leaking gutter poor pointing , is that not what you want in a contractor some body honest enough and has t he knowledge to tell the difference instead coming in saying u have rising damp, you will get rising damp in very old propertys of about 100 year old slate dpc and travels up through the motor beds bearing in mind more modern cements it does not travel though but propertys of 100 years plus you make your mind up
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Not too inclined to accept advice from someone who spams newsgroups and who is barely literate.
Seriously, did you you skip school the day they talked about the use of capitalisation and punctuation?
Tim
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ok pal obviously your just a another smart arse you got nothing better to do with your life part from get on hear and try and pick faults and grief them < ?????
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Unless you learn to punctuate, your postings make no sense. You might learn to spell as well while you're at it.
It also shows you lack education and your ramblings are worthless drivel.
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On 21/02/2015 07:37, harryagain wrote:

I'm with Tim and Harry too
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"newshound" wrote in message

"I also am with Tim and Harry"
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grunted:

Great stuff guys! Bogbrush*
*In-joke for Private Eye readers
--
David

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Missed capitalisations in "OK", needs a comma after "pal". Should be "you're"' not "your". Full stop missing after "arse". Missing capitalisation in "You" (which should be "you've" or "you have"), missing "a" before "part", should be "here", not "hear" and "grief them" isn't even English. Question mark should immediately follow "them", not a "<".
You might not think it matters but in the real world, people WILL judge you by how you write. You've not got off to a good start here.
Tim
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In article < snipped-for-privacy@news.eternal-septem

Hint to Mr Robinson: if you force me to spend 15 minutes figuring out what you're trying to say, then I won't bother.
--
"Freedom is sloppy. But since tyranny's the only guaranteed byproduct of
those who insist on a perfect world, freedom will have to do." -- Bigby Wolf
  Click to see the full signature.
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steven robinson wrote:

I've heard that said before.

Along with many others - including the Building Research Establishment (BRE) who produce some very interesting and practical solutions.

And they have been for years - and still not produced a definative answer for a certain cure.

Three feet or under and going down to floor level - high probability of rising damp caused by DPC failure or lack off and a few other things

Can be difficult no matter how expert you think you are.

Blocked cavites, dirty wall ties, defective DPC around doors and windows, heavy condensation from kitchens, bathrooms, damp washing drying off indoors, leaking roof at eaves level, cavity wall insulation etc, etc, etc.
is that not what you want in a contractor some body honest

And even the most honest and conscientious get things wrong - and the con artist makes a lot of money.

Along with the hygroscopic effect showing on black mortar render at high level, water penetration through the stone - and about a dozen different other reasons other than rising damp.

Not entirely true - compo, bricks and stone all absorb water, hence the reason for cavities.
All good fun the rising damp lark and its so-called cures - and in buildings of "100 years" or so, very often the cure is a simple shovel and and a bit of elbow grease to shift the earth and detritus that has built up against the walls over the years - rather than an "expert" with their chemical and patent DPCs.
BTW, how well versed are you on the more insidious enemy called Merulius Lacrymans and its eradication?
And I must admit to feeling a little mischievous in replying to this post in the vein that I have, as having dealt with the effects of damp and rot in buildings and it's problematical identification of its sources and types for many years before retirement.
During that time, I found that a very good source of information about it emanated from the BRE Digests that I used to have sent to me - and that contractors who professed to be 'experts' in that field very often had less of an idea about the stuff than the clients who were paying for its eradication.
Cash
Who's on a little 'high' by having to forsake my usual nightly anethsetic (a couple of large Jack Daniel's Sourmash) for some rather strong prescription pain killing medication that's bloody keeping me wide awake tonight for some odd reason. So please accept my apologies for any offence I may have caused.
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On Saturday, February 21, 2015 at 1:34:07 AM UTC, Cash wrote:

The primary Victorian reason is normally reported as being to stop penetrating damp in high wind wet coastal locations. Though its use in other areas at the time indicates another reason too.
Lots of cavityless properties do fine in damp terms today, and the ones that don't seldom suffer rising damp, so I think the modern reason for the cavity is something else, namely insulation.

Yup, and unblocking vents and fixing rainwater goods etc.
NT
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On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 11:00:39 PM UTC, steven robinson wrote:

Maybe. Given the odds though I think few would rush to accept that. Damp tr eatment is not normally an honest game.

at subject about so called rising damp

You're in luck, I'm a scientist. People come to uk.d-i-y looking for people that can solve damp problems. If you're genuinely capable we should stop g iving you a hard time, even after the spam. But prove it.

n be very confusing half the experts say there is rising damp the other hal f say it does not ????

ld be breeching the dpc could be a burst pipe leaking gutter poor pointing , is that not what you want in a contractor some body honest enough and has the knowledge to tell the difference instead coming in saying u have risin g damp,
sure, but tells us little

e dpc and travels up through the motor beds

ys of 100 years plus you make your mind up
IIRC BRE said it only occurs with some sandy lime mixes, so I accept what y ou say on that point.
NT
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On Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:00:38 -0800 (PST), steven robinson
Quite possibly, but that does not make you competent. Many of the sellers of quack "natural" or homeopathic medicines honestly believe in what the sell. They lack the intelligence or will to research the subject properly and find out they are selling snake oil.

That should be interesting.

That argument has taken place, it wasn't a very long one.

All the experts will tell you there isn't in nearly all cases. Nearly all the damp proofers will tell you there is in nearly all cases.
The expert will often point to condensation being the problem, the damp traders rarely.
The test is fairly easy. If the "surveyor" uses only a wood moisture electronic meter they will diagnose rising damp. If the survey was free it will show rising damp. If the test is being done for a house buyer it will show rising damp.
There is no rising damp in the vast majority of cases.

Which requires the person evaluating the problem to have the knowledge, training and intelligence to diagnose the problem correctly and recommend the right solution - which is never a chemical DPC. People who have entered the trade via the "monkey see, monkey do" route of "on the job training" rarely manage to learn enough about the subject to diagnose the problem or prescribe an effective solution.
Most chemical damp proofing works because the vegetation and soil around the house is moved to give access to drill lots of useless holes. Some years ago a local damp proofing company had severe cash problems (shortage of) so they adopted the innovative solution of using water as their "chemical". After a few months they realised no one was actually complaining so they continued with no complaints for several years until an aggrieved ex-employee complained about them to Trading Standards.

Would these be electric motors or steam?
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/Would these be electric motors or steam?/q
Come on! he is an 'honest contactor'.....
Jim K
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wrote:

A good point :-) I am a bit concerned about his " plastering rendering woodworm treatments" though. Plastering the woodworm seems a bit excessive.
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not at all mate I do plastering rendering woodworm treatments timber treatm ents dry rot wet rot not just damp proofing as I was saying we deal with a lot condensation and mould also a lot of penetrating damp if you cant tell the difference you wo nt be in business long and you should call it what you want ignore the rising bit . if you got damp in your wall s you need it fixed if you ignore it it will get worse could spread create an environment for dry rot to start if you get that your floors / joists ca n be very expensive to fix what could been a small job can turn into thous ands
be carefull of these people saying we are scam artists cowboys any trade ha s its fair share just like car mechanics , there advice is very very dodgy , if u got damp it needs treated if you do it wrong it could cost a lot
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On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 11:07:19 PM UTC, steven robinson wrote:

unfortunately not true.

no-one said you were a scam artist, I asked if you were. It is not dodgy to ask that, damp treaters generally are scammy.
NT
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