Cutting mitres on 'tall' pieces of wood.

Having removed a Victorian fireplace from a bedroom in my son's house, I need to replace a length of skirting board across the front of the chimney breast.
Being an old house, the skirting board is typical of the age - being very 'tall'. I haven't measured it - but I would estimate around 7". This is much higher than the sides of any of the three mitre-blocks that I own. I don't own a mitreing chop saw - and cannot justify the expense as it would receive such little use in the future.
Any suggestions for how to cut an accurate mitre in a situation such as this?
--
Kev


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/05/2011 08:30, Ret. wrote:

You probably don't want a mitre cut with a mitre block anyway. They assume the corner needs to be square and that is very rare in any house, but particularly in Victorian houses IME.
If you feel you really need a router, you can get mitre cutting routing tools for them, but they will suffer from the same problem as a mitre block.
The best answer is careful mesurement, marking and cutting with a hand saw.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No suitable power tools?
Can you saw accurately to the line, if you mark out the mitre cut? Are you skilled with a hand plane?
Or failing either of those - the best saw job you can, and a lot of work with a sanding block!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need the right tool, which is a "board mitre". They're made by Emir (and have been since Noah bought his) and are about a tenner. http://www.toolshopdirect.co.uk/item.php/site/froogle/sn/EMI284
With this you'll also want to use a simple back saw. Tenon saws are a bit on the small side, so you might be better with a smallish and fine- toothed panel saw.
Despite being a form of mitre box, they're not a mitre box in the usual sense and a mitre box can't be used for wide boards. You need to saw the board from its back, not from one edge. Sawing down from the edge, even with a big bandsaw, tends to give an uneven edge.
Most corners are square enough that you can use a standard board mitre, unless you live in the Pentagon or one of Bath's crescents. A slight adjustment can be made by shimming underneath the board. It's usually best to cut the board fractionally sharper than the wall, as a little filler on the top edge isn't noticed, so long as there's no gap on the outer edge. If the wall isn't vertical, the board mitre can be clamped on the board so as to not be quite square, following the wall angle.
Some Victorian skirtings need an extra-wide board mitre and you might have to make your own. They're not hard. Mine is just 3/4" MDF with clamp screws from Pound Shop G clamps. If you make your own board mitre or mitre box, it's worth plastic-facing the saw's rubbing surfaces to avoid wear. Formica strips are good, PTFE rolls sold for the purpose are poor (Work well, but really hard to attach smoothly)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/05/2011 10:01, Andy Dingley wrote:

I did a load of 12" skirting recently with a cheapo circular saw set to 45 degs. Knocked up a jig and clamped it to a workmate

or this if the link somehow gets deleted
https://i52.tinypic.com/317ibyg.jpg" target="_images" rel="nofollow">
https://i52.tinypic.com/317ibyg.jpg">
https://i52.tinypic.com/317ibyg.jpg

I always work to the inside length (i.e. the wall), and allow the outside measurement to set itself. Can't think of any job where cockups are easier (RH mitre instead of LH etc), so I always give that second cut a lot of thought. It can be a very expensive mistake.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many thanks to everyone who responded to my query. All very helpful!
--
Kev

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ret. wrote:

Now the only problem is obtaining a length of matching skirting board... Been around all the local builders and timber merchants today - none of them have any skirting that is a good match for the piece I took in. I found a joiner who would router a length for me - but he would need to grind a 'bit' to make a good match and wanted 30 for a metre length! (He said the expense was in setting-up, and he'd charge the same price for 4 metres).
--
Kev


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/05/2011 19:54, Ret. wrote:

That sounds a fair, even cheap, price, given that he has to make a special cutter. I suspect he will be using a spindle moulder, rather than a router, as the cutters for those are relatively easy to make.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sometimes sticking a stock moulding on top of a 6" x 1" gives a good enough match.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nightjar <"cpb"@" < wrote:

I've decided to buy a length of the closest match and wrap it completely around the chimney breast. The join between the existing Victorian skirting and the new skirting will therefore be inside the alcove where they intend to put a chest of drawers on one side, and a wardrobe on the other, so the 'join' will be hidden!
--
Kev


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just make yourself a bigger mitre box, they're simple devices. Have the skirting lie flat down in it.
Re the board, you should find a match at a reclaim yard, and its cheap.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tabby wrote:

That's an idea.
--
Kev


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and if you line the slots with bits of steel tape measure, it stops the saw widening the slots. The steel bits can be replaced eventually.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good idea. That is exactly what was done in this house, and it was years before I noticed. The joint is nicely done, presumably with filler, and, when painted, just isn't obvious.
--
Graeme

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/05/2011 10:01, Andy Dingley wrote: ...

But you will always know the gap is there and you could have made it a perfect fit.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mark it out checking angle with bevel gauge, and cut with a tennon saw. If you have a lot of mitres then you could make a mitre block ... but cut with board horizontal not vertical
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.