Constructing a chimney on near-new build for multifuel stove

Hello,
apologies for a rather non-DIY question but this is unfortunately a tad above my knock-down-and-reconstruct-walls competence :-( ...
We have a three-year old bog-standard two-storey four-bedroom Persimmon house without a chimney, and now we're looking at the possibility of adding a multifuel stove in the livingroom, which of course will mean we'll need a proper chimney, probably with an external chimney breast.
I'd like to appear to be educated before approaching the contractors, and any thoughts about what I need to look out for would be highly appreciated.
My requirement is quite simple: I want a contemporary-style multifuel stove in livingroom, capable of being connected to the central heating system. It should be a nice and modern focalpoint, and heat the house :-) .
From there it gets complicated: I've read up on the various options which seems to leave pumice liner or double-skin liner for the flue, with pumice liner "better" but more expensive to install. A brick or block chimney breast "attached" to the external wall should not cause any headaches (the roof ridge is horizontal all the way and the gable end is exactly where the chimney would rise, and is the highest part of the wall/roof).
I've also picked up the BR Part J, and ordered a hopefully-relevant Amazon book: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Plus the usual Google searches and some useful info/"questions to ask the installer" from here: http://www.ourproperty.co.uk/guides/chimney_builders_repairers.html
I also intend to contact some of the chimney product manufacturers such as www.schiedel.co.uk, www.topstakchimneys.co.uk
So, questions:
1) How much would the construction of an external chimney itself typically cost, would it normally be of the order of 5k, 10k or 15k, if done completely by a contractor/builder? 2) What parts of this are within the reach of a capable DIY-er? Anything or would the potential savings/risks not be worth it? 3) What should I do/be aware of in order to keep the costs down, but not compromise on the safety and performance of the chimney? 4) Any other hints/thoughts...?
Thanks in advance!!!
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Most people would start this by visiting a "stoves" shop, they always have a resident expert and good local contacts into other trades.
They will probably be keen to take the "whole job" and contract out the masonry work. Least hassle for you, but probably the highest price if you go with them. But why not find out what they recommend and then talk to some other local contractors independently - you can always go back to the stoves shop for the install, if you want to give them some business.
You don't say if you're on a tight budget or looking for the rolls royce solution. I've recently had an (oil-fired) Rayburn installed, and used their recommended contractor (in North Norfolk). Whilst he wasn't cheap, he had a very "get on with it" attitude. His standard of work was faultless. Aga-Rayburn also do solid fuel Coalbrookdale stoves (and I mean stoves, rater than the ranges they're famous for).
However I did my woodburner (a Jotul - recommended) myself, bought the stove and liner online (where they are significantly cheaper), built my own constructional hearth etc. There is a lot of money to be saved this way.
Finally - another obvious starting point - talk to your local planning dept. Your project might have to grind to an early halt if they're not keen.
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You might need planning, but as far as construction is concerned it is more Building Regulation.
There maywell be something on:
http://www.communities.gov.uk/planningandbuilding/buildingregulations/
--
Michael Chare


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Undoubtedly it would require building regs approval, but that is simply an issue of compliance by using a safe and acceptable design.
First stop is planning, because I don't believe adding a chimney is a permitted development, and a successful application can never be assumed.
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oh wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)

Right. Now I HAD planning for the chimney, and we made it out of concrete block, apart from where it poked through the roof but the BCO STILL insisted on a double skinned stainless insualated flue inside it.
'But I could have poked that through the ruddy roof: whats the point of the chimney?' 'In your case, pure decoration' he replied..
So by all means make a brick stack up the side, for decorative purposes, but the BCO will likely insist that the flue itself for a multifuel boiler is double insulated stainless...
What I would do, is knock a hole in the wall, come out horizontally and put a 'sweeping eye' on and then go straight up clipping the stainless to the wall as you go, and then get a bricklayer to dig some foundations out and brick round it all the way up. with a little door at the bottom for sweeping purposes. Pop a nice pot on the top, and Robert is a relative.
Sweeping will have the soot outside the house..a better place for it.
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

It would be an interesting exercise to compare the cost of a brick chimney with liner and ss rigigid insulated sections plus all the fixings, offset at the eaves and cowl.
Poujolat do a mock brick chimney to disguise the ss sections. In fact the flue could go up inside the house and still look ok in a contemporary design.
The liner will be about 400 quid in 150mm and the sections are around 100 quid/metre.

Too true
AJH
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andrew wrote:

I am not sure that a brick chimeny with liners is legal for a stove these days. Be interesting to hear.
I eem to remember that the double insulated thing is required to keep flue temps up and reduce soot/tar etc build up.

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