Central Heating

Hiya,
Who's any good at central heating systems?
My upstairs radiators consist mainly of air. They are only hot right at the bottom and cold at the top. I figure more water needs to be in the system.
My problem is, where is the tap in my house to do this?
In my old house there were two inline taps and I re-filled as necessary, bleeded, topped up and bleeded routine. In this house the system is different.
It's a baxi solo 2 - It doesn't have a pressure gauge. It's a combi that heats up the storage tank in the upstairs cupboard and takes care of the radiators. It also has pipes leading to a small tank in the loft.
Can anyone give me any clues?
Cheers
Pete
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Sorted it now thanks. The answer was on the british gas website.
I didn't realise that the small tank in the loft was to continuously top up the heating system.
It just needed bleeding - too much built up gases.
--
Pete <feels daft now>



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On Sat, 6 Mar 2004 08:50:18 -0000, "PeterCB"

Did you have to pay for access? :-)

You may also want to add some corrosion inhibitor to the system. This is one of the cheapest insurance policies that you will ever buy, since the outcome of not using it is guaranteed to be expensive and the premium about 20.
.andy
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A well designed system in good condition should need virtually no topping up - the contents of the tank alone should last several years.

There should be no build up of gasses - if there is, it means something is corroding. And this can happen if air is getting into the water through fresh water being introduced through a leak, or pumping over.
I'd add inhibitor to prevent corrosion, and of course eliminate any leaks first.
--
*A fool and his money can throw one hell of a party.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I gather you've now found your header tank and sorted the problem. I assume that your previous systems were pressurised (unvented), whereas this one is vented. As others have said, make sure that there is inhibitor in the system to prevent corrosion. It's a good idea to check the header tank from time to time, to make sure that the ball valve hasn't stuck. It operates so infrequently that it is prone to sticking. Then, when some of the water evaporates and needs to be topped up, nothing happens - the level drops, and air is drawn into the system.
BTW, a Baxi Solo 2 is *not* a combi - it's a conventional boiler which heats your stored hot water via a heat exchanger in your hot cylinder, and heats the radiators directly - probably with a 3-port valve (or two 2-port zone valves) to control which it does when.
A combi produces "instant" hot water without needing a hot water cylinder, and also heats the radiators. That isn't what you've got!
--
Cheers,
Set Square
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