Cavity wall ties and insulation

Do these need to be done in any particular order, if they're being done at about the same time?
The insulation people said it doesn't matter as far as they're concerned, but will new insulation interfere with the work to install the new cavity ties?
Daniele
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D.M. Procida coughed up some electrons that declared:

Hi,
One method to replace cavity ties is to drill in from one side of the wall and insert new tie rods at intervals. I don't know the details, but I assume it involves a textured rod and glue.
I can't see it mattering which way round it's done.
Cheers
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D.M. Procida wrote:

Wall ties first and then cavity fill.
That way, if there are any problems with crumbling bricks, blocked cavities etc, these can be resolved first and then the cavitied filled and left undisturbed.
Cash
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 02 Jan 2009 12:55:22 +0000, D.M. Procida wrote:

No, but cavity wall insulation will frustrate any attempts to examine the condition of the existing wall ties to determine whether, or not, they need replacing.
If the ties are definitely corroded then so be it. If you are unsure, then, have an endoscope inspection done before it's too late.
HTH
--
sʇǝʌǝǝ

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, but we were going to have it done anyway.
Daniele
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D.M. Procida wrote:

It depends....there are two main types of replacement wall ties, chemical and mechanical. As the name suggests, the first type uses an epoxy resin on the part that goes into the inside block or brickwork, left to set, and then a nut is tightened on the outer skin to bind the two walls together - with this type it's preferable to have a clear cavity because a dust extraction tool is used to allow the resin to bond correctly with the inside skin, if there was wool everywhere this would be practically impossible. The second method is similar, except there is no resin used for the inside skin, it merely uses a type of expanding 'rawlbolt' kind of thing at the inside skin side and uses an ordinary nut at the outer skin, with this type, it doesn't matter whether the cavity is filled or not.
The chances are the WT replacement company stocks both types and will use whatever is required on the day.
--
Phil L
RSRL Tipster Of The Year 2008
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.