buscuit machine or router

I want to do some buiscuitting, I can't decide whether to spend some money on a separate maachine or go with the cheaper option of buying a bit for my router.
What i've read so far suggests that it's hard to get good results using a router without a router table.
I thought i'd see what the experts in here think.
Cheers, Rick
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On Tuesday, 16 October 2012 22:18:56 UTC+1, R D S wrote:

The point about biscuiting is that it's quick and simple to do. This requires a biscuit jointer, not a router.
You also can't make T joints with a router, as the axial motor would be in the way.
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On Tuesday, October 16, 2012 10:18:56 PM UTC+1, R D S wrote:

It rather depends on what you want to join. If it's a simple bit of edge to edge joining as in kitchen worktops, a router cutter is fine (so long as you don't change the plunge between a pair of cuts) and surprisingly easy to use. More complex tasks may well require the real deal.
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On Tue, 16 Oct 2012 16:18:55 -0500, R D S wrote:

I would just like to add, FFS why do I never check spelling before sending. HTF have I managed to spell biscuit wrong, twice and in two different ways?
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On 17/10/2012 00:42, R D S wrote:

Welcome to my world ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Tue, 16 Oct 2012 18:42:35 -0500, R D S wrote:

it really does take the buiscut, doesn't it? :)
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Jules Richardson wrote:

Every one knows its bis-cut, from the french, cut twice....
...I'll get my coat...
Oh shit, Its not funny. it IS from the french and it means twice cooked. As opposed to half-baked, one supposes.
--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
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On 16/10/2012 22:18, R D S wrote:

The joy main benefit of biscuit joints is the ease and speed of placement. You get none of that with a router for this application. The whole exercise is just unsatisfactory with a hand held router. Even in a table, the cutter sets are not large enough to match the biscuit shape with a single cut.
So for this application (much as I love routers), biscuit jointer every time. (and get one with a decent fence that is properly square to the blade and stays that way)
--
Cheers,

John.

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On 17/10/2012 01:55, John Rumm wrote:

+1
I have a cheap one and it is perfectly adequate.
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Depending on what you want to join and if it is an expense issue, you might consider dowelling joints. All you need is a jig and a drill and some dowelling . (Round section wood). With carefull measuring you don't even need the jig. Many joints, you can drill both bits of wood simultaneously.
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On Wednesday, October 17, 2012 7:59:40 AM UTC+1, harry wrote:

Cutting for biscuits with a router removes too much material in an area where you really need it.
We use biscuit joints ( Blue Bosch. We tried and rejected two deWalt. Too inaccurate )and dowel joints with a Mafell machine. The dowels usually win as they will hold their place in a glue up whilst one is applying pressure to the joint. Biscuits can be slid from side to side and dont hold as well before clamping. Having said that the adjustability of the biscuit joint can be a real bonus. Dowell joints need to be right from the get up and go. The Mafell has excellent fences making accurate drilling a breeze.
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On Wednesday, 17 October 2012 07:59:40 UTC+1, harry wrote:

Dowels are a pain though, as they require alignment in two axes. Biscuits only need one, so they are _far_ quicker to install and build with. Even if you need two-axis location for the completed structure, you do this with two biscuits, and only have to position each one precisely in one axis.
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On Wednesday, October 17, 2012 11:25:53 AM UTC+1, Andy Dingley wrote:

Yes but try building a box using only dowels. Dam thing wont stay together till you get clamps on it. I'm not saying its impossible just that it involves a lot more faffing about.With dowels it will practically hold itself together even without glue. And as I said we use a Mafell dowel jointer which is very accurate and has excellent fences.
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On 17/10/2012 07:59, harry wrote:

Nothing wrong with dowels, but they solve a slightly different problem from biscuit joints. So its a case of pick which is appropriate for the task.
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John.

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On Tue, 16 Oct 2012 23:59:40 -0700, harry wrote:

I am often fitting and changing worktops in our office/workshop at work, there's no need to clamp them but it would be nice if I could have the joins level.
From reading the posts i'll probably keep an eye on ebay and try to get a decent one at a reasonable price.
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Perhaps it has to be experienced how easy it is to set up and use a biscuit jointer. You can literally take it out of the box, maybe adjust the height stop since last use, and go.
I mainly use it for edge jointing solid timber boards when I need extra width. Simply lay the two boards side-by-side as they will be joined, strike a mark across in a few places (no measuring, doesn't have to be accurate), and apply the jointer to the marks. Glue and clamp. The cut-outs are very forgiving for minor adjustment.
Similarly easy to do stacked biscuits.
I guess as usual it comes down to "will you get enough use out of it?", and maybe "do you just want one anyway?".
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