Bath waste and HepVo

We've recently had a new bath installed (& turned around), due to the way the waste is located the plumber installed a shallow waste trap (which is cut into the floor) followed by a series of slightly sloping bends before it reaches the old pipe which connects to the outside main waste down pipe.
The old waste pipe, which goes through the outside wall, is higher than sloped waste from the bath. The plumber decided to elbow this up. He said this wouldn't be a problem as the water would push the waste water through, but the sloping part would always contain water.
The problem we have is the drainage from the bath isn't very quick. Having a shower can cause water to remain in the bath before slowly draining away.
I've read about these hepVo traps being used in places where space is tight. Would this help with our slow drainage problems if I elbowed straight from the waste of the bath to the hepVo then slope to the outgoing pipe?
TIA
Dave
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We've recently had a new bath installed (& turned around), due to the way the waste is located the plumber installed a shallow waste trap (which is cut into the floor) followed by a series of slightly sloping bends before it reaches the old pipe which connects to the outside main waste down pipe.
The old waste pipe, which goes through the outside wall, is higher than sloped waste from the bath. The plumber decided to elbow this up. He said this wouldn't be a problem as the water would push the waste water through, but the sloping part would always contain water.
The problem we have is the drainage from the bath isn't very quick. Having a shower can cause water to remain in the bath before slowly draining away.
I've read about these hepVo traps being used in places where space is tight. Would this help with our slow drainage problems if I elbowed straight from the waste of the bath to the hepVo then slope to the outgoing pipe?
TIA
Dave
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Dave wrote:

--
You didn't have a plumber - you had an idiot. For a start, that pipe
will end up 'silted' up.
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On 21 May 2007 06:38:22 -0700, Dave wrote:

Are you sure you have a shallow waste trap? I cannot see how a bath could be mounted so low as to need a cut in the floor with that fitted.
Steve
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Yes, it is a shallow trap. The hole in the floor was already there from a bodge of a previous plumber. I think my option will be to core drill a new hole lower down the wall so that it all drains off rather than being forced up and out of the current pipe.
We had a leak from the trap yesterday, where I found the trap wasn't sealed properly due to the way the pipes had been laid (should have done the job myself!), and no PTFE tape on the waste connector! Getting it to pieces was a mission as the whole of the pipework was full of water (as you would expect).
The HepVo traps, are there any limitations on where they can be placed along the waste, e.g. would I need to elbow off the bath waste then immediately insert the HepVo trap?
Cheers
Dave
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They can be fitted inline along the run.
The following design guide should be of use:
http://content.wavin.com/WAXHW.NSF/pages/PDF_HepVOTechDesignEN /$FILE/HepvOTDG.pdf
(or http://tinyurl.com/2hr3wh )
Mathew
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Thanks Matthew. If I'm fitting it straight off an elbow/knuckle connector from the waste, how can I try and get the thing to slope down without putting pressure on the knuckle around the waste? I'm thinking that putting the hepVo on wouldn't give me much drainage away.
Dave
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The HepVO elbow is 92.5 degrees so that the slope is achieved. It does work because I have done it.
Two things to note though
- If you don't have enough depth below the bath and there is much of a length of pipe, you can end up bringing the pipe back to being horizontal and then you will have a reduction in draining.
- Do make sure that you get the orientation of the trap correct as viewed from the side - outlet and ribs to the bottom.
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Andy, glad to hear someone has used one of these HepVo traps. The length of the pipe is approx. 2 metres. So I'm not going to get much of a slope (problem with bath being turned around). Thanks for the tip about the ribs being at the bottom!
Cheers
Dave
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Would it be realistic to raise the bath a little?
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On Tue, 22 May 2007 00:32:04 -0700, Dave wrote:

so at least one thing done right then
--
John Stumbles

I've got nothing against racists - I just wouldn't want my daughter to marry one
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"Steve" wrote

Deeper baths do have the outlet close to floor level and rely on waste piping, trap etc being (at least partly) within the depth of the floor. If the joists run parallel to the length of the bath then this is quite do-able, with the waste running below floor level then straight out through the facing wall. Raising the bath sufficient to allow room for trap and pipe work would make getting in and out difficult (without raising the surrounding floor).
Phil
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