Annual Christmas problem

A few weeks ago, my Christmas lights (carefully wound around a rolled-up Radio Times from Christmas 1997) worked fine when I dug them out from the back of a cupboard and plugged them in.
They also worked fine when I checked them again this morning.
So I switch them off, unrolled them (laying them out carefully on the floor) - and put them up.
In great excitement, I switched them on again - and yet another heroic failure!
Why does this happen each year?
--
Ian

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You really need to follow the herd and buy new ones every year. Still not go around to putting our 40 year old ones up.
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What! I've actually still got a set of lights from around 1950 (happy memories of my childhood). They had 20 12V bulbs, but nearly half have died - and I've used up the few spares that were there.
However, if pressed into service, they can still give a good account of themselves if I put a bit of silver paper in the sockets of the dead bulbs before screwing them in (so they are shorted out) - and either run them from either on around half voltage (from a transformer), or directly from the mains with a diode in series (which will half the average current).
However, the set that's causing me grief today is much more modern set of 40 - and it's probably only a little over 30 years old. I've now taken them down - and as I have a few spares, so I suppose the next step is to spend half the afternoon ensuring that all bulbs are tight - and if that doesn't work, either check each in turn with a meter, or by substitution. If necessary, I suppose I'll have to wait until they are selling them off cheap just after Christmas, and buy a new set for next year!
--
Ian

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writes

no wonder you have more money than you know what to do with .....scrooge.....good man
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I believe my grandfather was from Jockland - which might explain things.

--
Ian

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On Sunday, 18 December 2016 16:48:55 UTC, Ian Jackson wrote:

My mother was from Jockland and my father from Yorkshire.
A Yorkshireman is like a Scotsman stripped of his generosity.
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writes

if you think jock is ok why do people not like the term paki ?......
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writes

speshly on moderated groups?....
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On Monday, 19 December 2016 07:43:55 UTC, Jim GMDHJ ... wrote:

My grandfather was always called "Jock". (He lived and worked in England) He did not feel insulted by it.
We have a minority cult in the UK that likes to feel insulted on behalf of others. They have FA else to do.
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On Monday, 19 December 2016 07:43:55 UTC, Jim GMDHJ ... wrote:

It's associated with "paki bashing".
"jock bashing" if it exists is probably a different thing entirely.
Owain
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They should like both. They're just short forms of a word.
--
Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.

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About five years ago, I was told that a friend had bought bulbs for such a set. they were les 12v bulbs each with a moulded glass apparently decorated glass of things like santa, tree snow covered cottage,dodgy looking stars etc. They were of course made in China and looked a bit naff in the wiring department where they entered the bulb holder, but ehey did work and the bulbs blew open circuit which at leas was safe from the fire standpoint at least. It was a market stall in some northern town.
I suspect these things are still made, but modern safety regs normally stops them from appearing here. If someone is willing to use silver paper on a non isolated mains voltage device, I'm glad I was not insuring him! Brian
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The ones that blow short circuit are better, then you have one fuse bulb on the end. If a normal bulb blows, only it goes out and you know which one it is.

--
Women claim that they never pursue a man. Well, by the same token, a mousetrap never pursues a mouse, but the end result is
the same.
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Well I used to use an old set as a way to lengthen the chain and hence reduce the voltage on each bulb. That way they would neverblow. Of course when the blow shorted ones came out they became a death trap or a money making device for bulb makers for rather obvious reasons, even if you bought a set of 5 fuse bulbs they used to get lost between Christmasses and hence when one did blow, you had to go out and buy another pack. The other thing about the old kind is that seeing as all the wiring was, in effect at mains voltage unless they were running of course, you could not buy them any more as making them double insulated made the cabling and holders rather clunky and stiff. Brian
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It's a plot to make you buy new ones.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

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Run them off a dimmer switch, they last longer.
--
Why didn't Noah swat those two mosquitoes?

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Have a few sets (LED) all the same, for the tree. The 'string' plugs into the PS. This year, one PS had failed. Being a tight arse, cut it open to see if it could be fixed. Soon worked out it was the mains to low volts side which had failed, while the 'flasher' part was OK. Not the usual failed cap, so used a +/-15v volt supply I had lying around to give the 30v or so needed to drive the 'flasher' part and therefore the lights.
--
*Snowmen fall from Heaven unassembled*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I am the only one in our Avenue without LED lights! (for Xmas decoration that is)
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On 18/12/2016 13:37, DerbyBorn wrote:

Avenue - does that make it posher than a Road or a Street?:-)
--
Adam

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avenues are tree lined, so yes.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

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