Wood chips on wild grass

How deep do you spread wood chips?
https://i.postimg.cc/hPpMZsVC/chips.jpg
A tree trimming crew asked if they could leave "wood chips" where I hadn't expected such a huge pile. I'll need to spread them out a bit.
How deep on existing soil & wild grass would you put wood chips?
I'll have to wheelbarrow them and spread them out with a rake. I just want to know how deep to spread them.
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On 10/18/2018 7:07 PM, Grease Monkey wrote:

Depends , if you're trying to kill the vegetation you want them at least 3" deep . A lot thinner if you just want to scatter them to get rid of them . Considered using them for paths/walkways ? They will decompose eventually , but rob nitrogen from the soil while doing so . But it does give it back as it decomposes .
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Snag
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On Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 8:35:17 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

+1
If the intention is to kill the wild grass, and suppress new growth, then he can spread them as thick as he wants, it's just aesthetics at that point. If it's a wooded area where leaves aren't collected, that will start to cover it too. But as someone else said, you have to wonder about a tree trimming company asking to dump them. I can see them asking if you'd want them, but if you don't you're doing them a favor and should get a discount. It saves them a trip and possibly a fee to get rid of them. Also, is he sure the truck was empty when they arrived? If it's a small job they could have done another small job first.
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On Thu, 18 Oct 2018 19:07:07 -0500, Grease Monkey

This is scraps - make them remove it. They used your property as their dump site - probably saved them a drive .. John T.
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Oren posted for all of us...

Sometimes they start smoking because the internal temperature rises from "the rot".
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Oren wrote:

They'd be great for the smoker
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Next time ya cook some burgers, try some cherry. Damn its good, I can get my grandson to come see me if I tell him I'm cookin cherry burgers. It gives 'em a nice mahogany color and taste great. I'm with on the chunks, the chips just burn off to quick and ya don't get enough smoke from them
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On 10/20/2018 12:24 PM, ChairMan wrote:

  Wild cherry trees are considered weeds around here ... and they get pretty big too . I have a nice little stack of logs , chunk it up as needed for the smoker . Got a lot of hickory trees out there among the oaks too .
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oak and hickory are great together
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Oren wrote:

Post oak and hickory are the go to here in Tejas for briskets, I use pecan for my pork butts.
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Actually the Texas Crutch is usually foil. Wrap it in butcher paper when it hits the stall still allows to take some smoke and creates a better bark without getting mushy. Wrapping in a towel comes after it hits 205 IT and you pull and leave in the paper, then wrap in a towel and put in an ice chest to rest at least an hour or until yer guest arrive.I've let them sit for about 4-5 yrs that way and were excellent. The resting is very important for the brisket to be tender. Central Texas style is equal amounts of Kosher salt and course black pepper with a little garlic and onion powder. Low and slow at about 225-250. Aaron Franklin is the guru for Tejas Brisket

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnRRDSYgdmw

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