What options exist for getting duplicate automobile remotes?

Car is just bought by a kid just learning to drive (he's 16). 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer ES
Neighbors asked me what their options are for getting duplicate fobs.
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?filer87633keyfob.jpg
It came with only one key and one "remote" (see photo above). (I made a half-dozen keys for the kid so the question is about the remote.)
Anyone know what options there are for getting duplicate remotes?
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On 8/1/2018 11:41 PM, Arlen Holder wrote:

You can buy fobs off eBay but you usually have to have it programmed by a dealer.
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On 1 Aug 2018 20:52:48 GMT, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Do you know which number on the back is the "definitive" number for the correct fob?
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?filer87633keyfob.jpg
- FCC? - Canada? - Japanese? - Omron?
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On 8/1/18 11:41 PM, Arlen Holder wrote:

Here is one: http://www.keylessride.com/
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On 1 Aug 2018 20:57:28 GMT, "Retired wrote:

That's VERY NICE and useful! Do we have TWO choices as shown here? <http://www.keylessride.com/order/chooseremote.asp?make=Mitsubishi&remoteyear 04&model=Lancer>
Certainly the original
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?filer87633keyfob.jpg
Looks like the second one here... http://www.keylessride.com/order/quote.asp?lbfix=yes&make=Mitsubishi&remoteyear 04&model=Lancer&fridG286EA4
$105 remote plus programming PROGRAMMING Price INCLUDES programming instructions and all required programming tools for training the vehicle to recognize the remote.
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On Thu, 2 Aug 2018 05:36:27 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder

IOf you have 2, you can add 3rd and 4th etc very easily. With only one I THINK it is a bit more difficult.
Try this:::
https://northcoastkeyless.com/2004-mitsubishi-lancer-keyless-entry-remote-fob-programming-instructions/
When you are done your neighbor will think you are a genius!!!!
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On 2 Aug 2018 14:23:21 GMT, Clare Snyder wrote:

Wow Clare ... you are the genius!
If those instructions are legit, it sure seems that we can buy a handful of remotes and just program them all together at the same time.
Here's my summary of that document: <2004 Mitsubishi Lancer Keyless Entry Remote Fob Programming Instructions> <https://northcoastkeyless.com/2004-mitsubishi-lancer-keyless-entry-remote-fob-programming-instructions/ "Many people don?t know that they can purchase their own replacement vehicle entry remote, save up to 70% off of marked up Dealership prices, and program the replacement remote to their vehicle themselves."
First, verify this is on the back of the remote: * FCC ID: OUCG8D-525M-A * Factory Part No.: MR587983
I just looked at the original pictures where the FCC ID matches perfectly, but that "Factory Part Number" doesn't exist on the current fob (maybe it's already an aftermarket fob?).
1. Insert key into the Ignition and leave it in the OFF position. 2. JUMP OBDII Ports 1 and 4 with a suitable jumper wire. 3. Within ten (10) seconds, PRESS the Hazard Light Switch six (6) times. 4. The door locks will cycle once indicating entry to Programming Mode.
On the first remote to be programmed... 5. PRESS the LOCK Button three (3) times within ten (10) seconds. 6. Door locks will cycle once indicating successful programming
7. For all other remotes, individually repeat step 5 within one (1) minute.
8. REMOVE the jumper wire connected to the Data Link Port. 9. Programming is now complete. 10. Test all remotes.
Sometimes such things are like an "rm -r *" command, so I hope it's legit, but if it is, it seems all I have to do for them is figure out if the missing "Factory Part Number" is critical and where best to buy a handful of these remotes!
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 3 Aug 2018 08:56:02 -0000 (UTC), Arlen

It used to be that when you did this, you had to reprogram the keys or fobs (I forget which) that you already had, which were working, at the same time you did a new one. (and I was afraid I'd mess them all up.)
but with my 2004 Chrysler and 2005 Toyota, I dont' think that was true.
Just follow the directions to the letter.
It might help to have someone read you the instructions while you do it. At least for me, on the first couple tries, I can't remember more than one step at a time, and the time it took for reading even though I thought I turned the key on and off, or the lock button up and down, the right number fo times, it took 4 or 5 tries to get it right. but that was the first one. After that I got much better.

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wrote:

\ On the mitsu it is true. Says right in the documentation. When you go ito "programmode" it erases ALL existing remotes.

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On 3 Aug 2018 18:23:40 GMT, Clare Snyder wrote:

I'm gonna assume those "existing remotes" can be re-programmed on another car?
There's a reason I ask, which is we're asking the original owner to come up with more remotes, if he can.
BTW, does anyone know if the three-button remote Clare found can also be used instead of the two-button remote the kid currently has?
The reason I ask is that, for some reason, the trunk doesn't open with the one key he has, and, there's no way to open it by hand, so the *only* way currently to open the trunk is via the lever in the cockpit (since the fob he has is only a two-button fob).
Seems to me, if the three-button fob works, that this would solve the trunk problem too.
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On Sat, 4 Aug 2018 01:31:36 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder

Remember - you are NOT PROGRAMMING THE REMOTE. You are training the BCM - or "adding the remote" to the BCM

If a 3 button fob is available for the car, it will work. Personally I've never seen an OEM type fob with only 2 buttons, I'm sure they must exist, but I've never run across one. I think even most pickup trucks come with 3 button fobs (and some have power tailgate locks - - -
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On 3 Aug 2018 19:59:34 GMT, Clare Snyder wrote:

Thanks for that clarification (I saw it in another post also). Much appreciated.

This one is two buttons, but I agree, the three button fob is the way to go! 1. Lock 2. Unlock 3. Trunk
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In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 2 Aug 2018 05:36:27 -0000 (UTC), Arlen

You don't have to spend anywhere near this for most cars. I programmed fobs for Chrysler and Toyota last summer, and each fob was about $10. Insturctions are online for free.
You don't need a number off the back. Go to an ebay page (or maybe it was Amazon) and find someone who sells fobs and put in the year, make, adn model of the car and it will tell you if he has the fob to fit it.
I got keys the same way, for even less money.
And it's not just those two makes. Just about all of them
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On 3 Aug 2018 00:57:29 GMT, micky wrote:

Thanks for this input, where I've been concentrating on the oxygen sensor thread (for obvious reasons of triage) but where this information is useful.
One question.
How do they prevent theft?
That is, what proof do you normally give them that it's YOUR car?
NOTE: I'm not trying to steal a car ... I'm just trying to understand the process.
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On 8/3/2018 4:42 AM, Arlen Holder wrote:

Most cases require you to bring one of the original fobs to get the new one programmed. Dealer may have you listed as the owner and that would suffice.
My boss went to Europe. His wife took his car and locked the keys inside and the dealer was 50 miles away. I had to give the dealer the VIN and have a local locksmith vouch for me since he knew the both of us and did work for the company.
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On 3 Aug 2018 06:06:23 GMT, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Thanks. I'm not trying to steal a car, but it seems, from Clare's nice instructions, that all you need to do is buy the fob and get a hold of one of the other fobs, and you can make keys.
Of course, all the fobs will be no good, so if you did it without the knowledge of the owner, the owner's own key fobs would stop working.
But, according to what Clare sent, you don't need anything but the fob and the car and that's it.
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On Fri, 3 Aug 2018 15:10:45 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder

That is for the remote entry fob - NOT the immobilizer key.
2 different animals - although some vehicles DO integrate the remote entry fob into the head of the key.
The newer cars use RFID to automatically unloch the vehicle when you approach, and lock it when you leave, and allow you to start the car without a key by pressing the start button.
That is different technology COMPLETELY
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On 3 Aug 2018 18:34:40 GMT, Clare Snyder wrote:

I know what you mean because the sister of this kid has a Camry 2005 with the immobilizer driving her nuts because it goes on constantly.
When I'm done helping with the 2004 Lancer, I may get her some remotes for her Camry and program them.

My even older bimmer does that.

Yup. These are older cars.
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The "fob" is nopt programmed. It is added to the programming of the BCM of the car. You "train" the BCM - you don't "program" the fob.
With some Imobilizer keys you DO need to program the chip on the key. On others you can train the ECM to accept the code in the key.
In MANY cases "programming" the key is actually "cloning" the key - and if you have a car that has "memory seats" the cloned key will always set the seat to the same position as the original, while a key "trained" i to the ECM will have it's own settings.
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On 3 Aug 2018 18:31:19 GMT, Clare Snyder wrote:

Yup. My bimmer has that per-key "seat memory" too.
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