Water heater t&p

A guy from our city gas told my wife this T&P line needs to go down. I just need to run it directly to where it enters the wall, without going up, correct? Also, the other photo shows where the line exits the house. As you can see, it is crimped and broken off. Is this OK?
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On 7/13/2017 7:14 PM, Pauschl wrote:

No it certainly is NOT okay that the end is crimped. Further, I strongly suspect that it's probably contrary to code to reduce the T&P relief line down to that size (¼" or 3/8"? Whatever)
If that T&P Relief valve lets loose and the water cannot escape, you might just as well have sealed off the T&P valve with a plug.
As for the direction of the piping, it should not make any difference which way it goes since if it kicks in and must transport water away from the water heater, it will be under pressure (tremendous pressure at that). As to what the plumbing code might say, well, that's another story.
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On Thursday, July 13, 2017 at 8:46:48 PM UTC-4, Unquestionably Confused wro te:

you

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+1
I've never seen one go uphill, but as long as its where it can't freeze, li ke you say, I don't see a problem with the physics. But also like you say, IDK what code says about it. For sure that's a bad hack job. Reducing to a small tube for sure isn't going to pass,even if it's not crimped. I've ne ver seen a tpr valve in the top of the tank either, only on the side. Give n the height between inside and out, not sure it can go outside without goi ng uphill either.
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My t&p is on top.
But it doesn't drain like that!
NOTHING about that install is correct.
If an inspector sees it, he'll not only fail that, he'll start looking around for what else is wrong, and fail that too. Usually anybody that does work that bad screws up everything they touch.
I'm not sure you're actually required to run the t&p line outside. I've seen a lot that just drain on the floor, which will make a mess, but at least it saves your house from an explosion. (watch Mythbusters. Scarey!)
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On Friday, July 14, 2017 at 9:40:11 AM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

+1
I'd also check anything else he may have worked on for safety, especially anything with gas or electricity.

Every one I've seen, including new construction here, just go down close to the basement floor.
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I just looked at the one at work, and it's on the side.
But that one's gas, like the OPs. Mine at home is electric, so maybe they're different.
Or maybe I just misremember.
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On 7/14/2017 10:19 AM, TimR wrote:

Regardless of placement, the working principle is the same. I would submit that the manufacturers know what they are doing and they leave the ignoring of installation instructions up to the consumer. ;-)
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On 7/13/2017 7:14 PM, Pauschl wrote:

Daaaaaaaaamn, This makes some of my work look good. Here ya go ... it's not rocket science ... well in this case it could be if the bottom blows out of the tank. http://www.watts.com/pages/support/tp.asp?catIdd and a what if video ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIm6JXQQ8kw

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