Power went out - generator kicked on - but only half the house is lit up?

Normally the Generac generator feeds the whole house. No fuse is tripped and I switched them all anyway (like everyone does). What would make a generator only feed half the house? (if that)
At first it wouldn't go on automatically - so that may be a clue. I had to switch it to automatic from manual and after a dozen of those switches, it went on automatically.
I'm wondering how to debug the transfer switch but I opened both up and they seem to be the same with no moving parts.
Any ideas?
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On Tuesday, December 19, 2017 at 5:35:25 AM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

Just get a meter and start tracing back the hot leg that has no voltage.
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On Tue, 19 Dec 2017 05:25:10 -0800 (PST), trader_4
Just be aware that if there are any 240v loads there, it will have 120 to ground, even if the feed is open. I would start right at the inlet from the transfer equipment, looking for 240v.
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replying to Danny D., Iggy wrote: Sounds like you'll need an Electrician to replace your Relay, as only 1-leg of the generator's feed is activating and the other is getting stuck. As far as I know, you can't take them apart to lube them or anything like that. The Electrician can let you know if it's a wise choice to replace all Relays, since 1 failing may be an indication of all wearing, corroding or fatiguing.
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On 12/19/2017 2:35 AM, Danny D. wrote:

If you gots "bugs" in yer transfer switch, you is fucked! LOL
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On 21/12/17 01:04, BurfordTJustice wrote:

> What do you tell the insurance company's loss adjuster? He will demand a report from the electricity company, and any other relevant investigations, e.g. for the Coroner.
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On 21/12/17 01:04, BurfordTJustice wrote:

Until you kill somebody, either by electrocution or in the conflagration that followed. A rash of house fires here were started by skateboards with batteries that overheated while on charge. I attended an inquest for a young married man who had no respect for 240 volts. He had one of those toolboxes with power points around the edge. Somehow, he managed to get past the foolproof construction, and plug in an extension cord socket first (I have no idea why.) Then he grabbed the live pins. Many installers of fibreglass insulation batts on a Govt contract died when they drove wire fastenings through insulated mains wiring.
Maybe you have a right to kill yourself, but even if you don't care about your family, you are supposed to get their permission before killing them as well.
Doug.
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"Doug Laidlaw" wrote in message
On 21/12/17 01:04, BurfordTJustice wrote:

Until you kill somebody, either by electrocution or in the conflagration that followed. A rash of house fires here were started by skateboards with batteries that overheated while on charge. I attended an inquest for a young married man who had no respect for 240 volts. He had one of those toolboxes with power points around the edge. Somehow, he managed to get past the foolproof construction, and plug in an extension cord socket first (I have no idea why.) Then he grabbed the live pins. Many installers of fibreglass insulation batts on a Govt contract died when they drove wire fastenings through insulated mains wiring.
Maybe you have a right to kill yourself, but even if you don't care about your family, you are supposed to get their permission before killing them as well.
Doug.
its brattworst
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On 21/12/17 02:19, Clare Snyder wrote:

He wanted 12 volts. I think that one panel may be 12 volts. We have 3 panels of 0.5 KW each. According to the indoor label, the open circuit voltage from them is 267 volts D.C. He may have been in for a BIG surprise!!
1.5 Kw wouldn't run a 2 Kw radiator, but our panels are complementary to the mains. Our average power usage until then was 0.7 Kw. Any excess generated is fed back into the grid.
Doug.
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On Thu, 21 Dec 2017 03:48:52 +1100, Doug Laidlaw

If it's a 12 volt line it won't be 267 volts. If it's 12 volts it won't electrocute anyone, and if it's lkess than 50 volts it is considered "low voltage" by the NEC (I believe it is 36 volts in Canadian code) and is pretty much "unregulated". "Low Voltage" lighting circuits donot require a permitor a licensed electrician. (as long as the supply is limittes to some insane level like 1000VA)
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"Clare Snyder" wrote in message wrote: >On 21/12/17 02:19, Clare Snyder wrote:

If it's a 12 volt line it won't be 267 volts. If it's 12 volts it won't electrocute anyone, and if it's lkess than 50 volts it is considered "low voltage" by the NEC (I believe it is 36 volts in Canadian code) and is pretty much "unregulated". "Low Voltage" lighting circuits donot require a permitor a licensed electrician. (as long as the supply is limittes to some insane level like 1000VA)
I've already been.
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"Low voltage" is not really defined in the NEC. It may mean less than 600 volts in general wiring circuits. If we are actually talking about what most people consider low voltage, it is 15 volts in things like pool and landscape lights and 30v in other control and signaling circuits. This really gets defined in article 725 and has more to do with available current than voltage but this is what most people think of when they say low voltage. Class 1 circuits are the ones that can go up to 1000va but they also have to use 600v rated wiring methods and look pretty much like your regular line voltage wiring. In fact you can run class 1 circuits in the same raceway as line voltage, Class 2 is the 30v or less, current limited power supply circuits that you can use bell wire on and get away with lots of other stuff. Class 3 is still current limited but higher voltage and wired similar to class 2.
These are all still regulated by the NEC tho and a lot of jurisdictions are finally getting serious about enforcement. Florida has a specialty license for low voltage installers that includes communication circuits, landscape lighting, sprinklers and other similar stuff. That mostly affects "for hire" services but some AHJs want a homeowner to get a permit, even for low voltage. They just want the money I suppose. They are the same ones who say you should get a permit to replace a wall switch.
I am an inspector and I call bullshit on that.
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In alt.home.repair, on Tue, 19 Dec 2017 10:35:17 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Didn't it come with an instruction manual that deals with this, at least a tiny bit?

Like trader says, use a voltmeter. When you find the bad part, google the part number and you may be able to find the exact replacement by the same maker. If not, you still may be able to find the part online by its name..
But if not, Generac might/should have it. Make sure the generator isn't going to start when you're replacing the part.
A short story, my friend had an oven that was broken, maybe it was just the light that didn't go on, and I got her to call my friend, who is an electrician. He told her she needed some part or assembly and that he couldn't get it, and he didn't charge her. She took the thing apart and found the actual switch inside the assembly and bought it online for much less money, because it wasn't the whole assembly. I don't know how common such a situation is.
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On Tuesday, December 19, 2017 at 5:35:25 AM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

domestic power in the US is usually delivered as split 240 V that provide 2 different 120 v circuits. If 1/2 your house is out, probably one of those two circuits is not working. That could be due to a fault in the transf er switch or a fault in the genny. if you had to ask that question, you sh ould probably get someone to help you do the troubleshooting.
m
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On Tue, 19 Dec 2017 10:35:17 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Check to make sure the generator is putting out 240 volts (120 on each side, line to neutral) If it is, you have a transfer switch problem. If not, you have a generator problem.
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