light bulbs voltage, wattage and heat

Do a 5W 12 volt light bulb and a 5W 110 volt light bulb (same type) give off same amount of heat? In other words, for same type of bulbs, does voltage affect the amount of heat given off?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/17/19 11:56 PM, Oumati Asami wrote:

"Theoretically" (watch the weasel word) they should give off the same heat, providing their "efficiency" is the same. A good test of this wold be if they gave of the same lumens.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep

Nope.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/18/19 2:56 AM, Oumati Asami wrote:

Cents both light bulbs are 5 whats, dey both produce abut 17 btus/hr.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:26:14 +0630, Oumati Asami wrote:

Voltage (V) = Energy per charge
Current (I) = Charge per second
Power (W) = V * I = Energy per second
Hence, devices that consume the same power will dissipate the same energy.
The difference between the two bulbs that you mention is that one bulb (110 volt) will produce the same energy using less current.
The only question is the form of the dissipated energy.
In the case of of an incandescent filament (light bulb) all energy is radiant energy (light), but a portion of the radiant energy can be infrared light (heat) and a portion can be visible light. An incandescent bulb radiates a lot of infrared but the exact proportion depends on the type of incandescent bulb.
But there are other ways to produce light: LED, florescent, etc. Only "bulbs" of the same type can be meaningfully compared.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18/06/19 17:46, F. Russell wrote:

Does that mean I would save electricity bill by using 110 v bulbs than 12 v bulbs? I was going to buy 12 12v bulbs but now I may buy 110 v ones. That brings up another question. Why were the 12 v spot lights installed in the first place? They need a transformer to work. So, they are intrinsically more expensive to begin with. It seems to me 110v lights should have been installed in the first place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/18/19 6:36 PM, Oumati Asami wrote:

You also have a conversion loss getting the 110v to 12v.
If memory serves me, some halogen bulbs burn better at 12V. That may be why
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[answers interspersed]

short answer, no. (but see the longer one later).
5 watts of energy going through the bulb leads to 5 watts of heat in the room. The part that's converted to light turns to heat once it hits the objects it illuminates, so aside from any going out the window, it all behaves the same.
Now the longer part: it's quite possible that one of the lamps (the proper name for what people call bulbs..) is more efficient than the other in creating light.
Hence... you might get the same amount of usable illumination from a 4 watt lamp, or from five of them instead of six of the other. And that reduction in fixtures would reduce the heat a notch.

Nope. The "current" (amperage) is less in the higher voltage lamp, but the net wattage is the same. (watts = volts time amps)

12V wiring is easier and safer to work with. You're not going start fires (well, not easily) or get zapped off the ladder if you touch the live wire...
No need for an electrician, etc.
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 10:07:30 PM UTC-4, danny burstein wrote:

But there is also some small loss in the power supply to create the 12 volts.

That would depend on your skills and local code. Low voltage wiring is covered in the NEC. If you don't know what you're doing, you can still create a situation that will burn the house down.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, you pay for watts, not current.

Those are quartz iodide bulbs, easier to do 12V

It more complicated than that with the bulbs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 9:36:51 PM UTC-4, Oumati Asami wrote:

IDK where 110v came from, in the US standard is 120V. You would save a little using line voltage bulbs, because the power supply for 12v will have some small losses in it. I think the main attraction for low voltage indoor lighting is for places where line voltage wiring requirements would make it difficult to install, eg for light under kitchen cabinets.

How are you going to put a 110V bulb in a socket powered with 12V?
That brings up another question. Why were the 12 v spot lights

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.