Is there any reason to replace the fan?

On Thursday, January 30, 2020 at 10:25:33 AM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:


Cindy just brought up a good point. What if there are no soffit vents? If Micky's house has no soffit vents, only a ridge vent and you put a fan in the middle, part way up the roof, I can see that having a big effect on cooling. Many houses have soffit vents and then the insulation installers later shove insulation over them, blocking them. There are plastic chute things available that you staple to the underside of the roof between each rafter, down by the vents, extending up a few feet to keep them open. Same are used in vaulted ceilings to keep the bays open for air.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Jan 2020 10:25:22 -0500, Ralph Mowery

The only way it would do much good is if EITHER the soffit vents or the ridge vent were severely restricted - otherwise convection would be MUCH more effective than a piddly fan.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 30 Jan 2020 10:25:22 -0500, Ralph Mowery

I know. That certainly makes sense and it must be happening to some extent but there is no arguing with success. The ridge vent has never been closed off. And I can see the soffitt vents from inside the attic. They're about 8" deep and as wide as the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 29 Jan 2020 23:10:09 -0500, Ralph Mowery

Somehow he appears to have both - - -= ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, January 29, 2020 at 8:57:39 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

I'm a little curious. Do steamy showers or baths affect the humidity in the attic space that much? My bathroom vent fan exhausts to the outdoors, so I've never thought about the humidity that might leak around the fan housing. (The attic access--right outside the bathroom-- has a gasket.)
Cindy Hamilton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cindy Hamilton wrote:

I had a customer once with bathroom exhaust fan that went to the roof but had bad water stains on the ceiling around the vent in the bathroom. Problem was the exhaust duct between the vent and the roof was exposed in the cold attic (in winter). It didn't leak but it got bad condensaton when the duct got warm from a shower and condensation ran down the outside back towards the bath ceiling vent.
Solution was to insulate the exposed duct in the attic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/30/2020 6:36 AM, Gary wrote:

  Gary , the scenario you presented is physically impossible ! Water condenses on COLD surfaces , not warm . I suggest the cold attic chilled the duct causing the warm moist air inside to condense on the INSIDE . It's still gonna cause the damage you described  as the condensation wicks out into the surrounding drywall/plaster/whatever . Solution is the same ...
--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry Coombs wrote:

I stand corrected. You're right. And as you said, still the same back to bathroom ceiling problem and the insulation did fix the problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 30 Jan 2020 03:21:22 -0800 (PST), Cindy

That's a good question. My fans, from two bathrooms side by side, exhaust to an inch or two below the roof ridge rail. (I'm not sure where the first floor fan vents to. Maybe I'll look) Not sure why, maybe it saved a little money not to have 3 holes in the roof, three vents, and the trouble of roofing around them.
But the instructions that came with the fan talked about running the fan after one took a steamy shower. Because I guess, the humidity would be bad for the wood in the attic. I don't know if home-priced humidistats existed in 1983, but the instructions might have mentioned them too.
One of the bathrooms had a separate switch for the fan, and two of the first things I did were, in the bigger bathroom, put in a light over the sink and in the housing for that light, put a switch for the fan, which I promptly turned off and havent' turned on since then. The new light was half way between the ceiling light and the wall switch, which had also controlled the fan. (And still does. The fan won't run unless both switches are one.)
And in the powder room, it was going to be too hard to put in a wall switch so I just unplugged the fan, in the ceiling. That fan is meant, iiuc for odors, and of course there are none.
When my mother moved to Baltimore, to an apartment whose bathrooom(s?) had no windows so they put in a fan, I put in a switch for each, a pull-chain right through the housing. I was like a typical tenant who considers the changes he makes improvements and not damage. The apartment never complained. I had asked my mother and she hated the fan's noise as much as I did, even though it wasn't much noise.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, January 30, 2020 at 8:29:32 AM UTC-5, micky wrote:

Yeah. When we moved in to our house the bath fan was flex-ducted to just below a roof vent (no ridge vent on our house). We quickly changed that to vent out a hole in the relatively nearby gable end. At that time, my husband was a little timid about making roof penetrations so the gable end seemed like a reasonable route. (He got over the roof penetrations thing.)

All of those fans are supposed to vent to the outdoors, not the attic.
The manufacturer recommends running the fan after a shower to dry up the bathroom. So people don't get pissed off with their product and badmouth them on the Internet. They aren't really interested in protecting your dwelling from moisture damage. And their warranty says so, quite explicitly. Cindy Hamilton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 30 Jan 2020 05:45:33 -0800 (PST), Cindy

If I used the fans, I would have at least considered correcting that.
I've never noticed a hole in an outside wall to vent The 1st floor powderroom fan. The powder room is on the east side of the house (and the other two are on the west). Next time I'm in the attic I hope I remember to check if they vent it 20 feet up to near the roof.

Wouldnt that take an hour or two? It takes an hour or more without the fan and I can't imagine the fan would help much. So I'd be listening to that darn noise for an hour.

I bought mine in '83 when few people were on the net.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Jan 2020 01:04:08 -0500, micky

It only takes about 35 seconds to clear the condensation off the 16 sq ft mirror in the bathroom if I crack the window open half an inch or so. Letting the moisture get "sucked out" by the extremely dry outside winter air is VERY effective. Don't need fans aswe have windows in both bathrooms that can open if required.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Jan 2020 08:29:28 -0500, micky

They did

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Jan 2020 03:21:22 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton

Not if you have a good vapor barier and all the light boxes etc are properly sealed, and the fan vent duct is tight. A lot of IFs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, January 30, 2020 at 4:39:52 PM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:

Ah. Vapor barrier. Nonexistent in my 1948 house. Not even a tarpaper.
Cindy Hamilton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Jan 2020 03:31:10 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton

A good coat of oilpased enamel on the plaster does the job- spray foam to seal around light boxes etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In alt.home.repair, on Wed, 29 Jan 2020 20:57:34 -0500, micky

My fault. I shouldn't have used the word "any".
So let me rephrase the question. Given that the fan has served me well and I intend to continue to have one, is the rust he reports a good reason to replace the fan.
Given that the fan looks like new from the inside, I cant imagine there is enough rust one the outside to prevent the fan from being nailed firmly in place, even the current nail holes have gotten bigger.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/31/20 1:11 AM, micky wrote:

You are wasting electricity and causing climate change. All the leftards are installing energy-efficient solar fans.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Jan 2020 01:11:04 -0500, micky

Get a can of tremclad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.