High Efficiency Furnace intake pipe does not go outside. Is that OK?

Hi everybody, I have just installed new High Efficiency furnace (Keeprite). In the manual 2 pipes are depicted (Exhaust and intake) running outside of the house. However, the installer has left the intake pipe inside of the basement (the pipe is about 20 inches long above the furnace). He says it's OK to have an intake pipe to suck the air from within the basement. Is it?
Thanks a lot!
Viktor
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Is it?
City Hall may be able to advise. The Ontario housing code was changed about 25 years ago to require outside air for furnace supply. This is usually done by piercing a four-inch hole through the foundation or wall, and fitting an insulated trunk which hangs down to near floor level.
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Don Phillipson
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On Fri, 3 Mar 2006 10:17:03 -0500, "Don Phillipson"

Probably not. The point of an intake pipe, instead of just a grill, is that your combustion air doesn't come from the house.
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You hired a hack, the efficiency rating specified won`t be met with indoor air since you are pulling in cold makup air. Indoor air pollutants actualy shorten the coils life, your warranty may in fact be void with indoor air. Demand he fix it and stop payment. If he screwed that up who knows what else, he just wanted to save time from drilling a hole. Make sure he has the proper install on the intake -exuast, read your manual.
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On Fri, 3 Mar 2006 12:14:33 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Yes, he hired a hack and got exactly what he paid for...........nothing more, nothing less. Thought it was such a great deal and now found out it wasnt. If he wants a second pipe outside he can open his wallet and pay for it. Bubba
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Not really. Because if it sucks in air, that air has to come from outside, and then cold air will be sucked into your house. If you have an extremely tight house, you may even starve the furnace for air, and that is a very bad thing. So insist on putting the intake outside of the house.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yea sure, he is trying to tell you he knows more than the guys who designed the furnace. If you think this guy know more than the engineers who designed the furnace, then go with his easy way out. If however you, like me, believe the guys who spent all those years in college and spent time testing the design might know more than this guy, I suggest you demand that he do the job right.
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

This thread get me interested. My gas furnace only has one 3" PVC to outside - I think that is the exaust pipe. I wonder if my furnace is taking air from the basement? One of the kids stays in the basement most of time - even sleeps in one of the rooms there. Is it safe there?
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never heard wrote:

Do you have the manual for the furnace? I suggest starting there to determine what is required.
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Teah a single exhaust pipe is safe to the occupants BUT
It makes the furnace use pre heated air for combustion, wasting energy. sometimes that indoor air air is contaminated with household chemicals that can cause heat exchangers to rot out...
get the installer to finish the job, he is lazy cold air is more dense and burns better.
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You may want to review where the furnace is exhausting. There are a number of ill-knowledged installers who place the exhaust pipe in the wrong location (not recommended to be by any windows, etc...).
JW
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replying to never heard, Jerry wrote: 3" pipe is ok but you need one for intake and one for an exhaust. My guess would be if you don't have a fresh air intake pipe you would be using up oxygen in your house.
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On Wednesday, December 6, 2017 at 6:14:08 PM UTC-5, Jerry wrote:

Sigh. This is an old thread, it's all been discussed before. It's generally permissible to install a furnace using indoor air for combustion, no outside air intake. Install manuals typically show both that way and with an outside air intake.
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On 12/6/2017 6:22 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Furnaces and boilers used inside air since they were invented. Using and outside source for combustion air is just in the past couple of decades. The only difference is efficiency. Anything going out the stack has to be replaced by sucking cold outside air in through every crack in the house.
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On Wednesday, December 6, 2017 at 6:57:15 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

uess

up

-efficiency-furnace-intake-pipe-does-not-go-outside-is-94860-.htm

erally permissible to install a furnace using indoor air for combustion, no outside air intake. Install manuals typically show both that way and with an outside air intake.

Depends too on where the furnace is. If it's in heated living space, it's worse. If it's in an unheated garage or basement, then it may not make much difference. For one thing, if you bring in 20f outside air, the furnace w inds up heating it too, ie you get less heat output than if it used 50f bas ement air.
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On 12/6/2017 6:12 PM, trader_4 wrote:

  I don't think they preheat the combustion air . It goes straight to the burner at whatever temp it is when it enters . And as far as that 50° basement air , you'd only be heating that if your cold air returns were in that space .
  --
  Snag
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On Wednesday, December 6, 2017 at 8:02:16 PM UTC-5, Terry Coombs wrote:

guess

g up

gh-efficiency-furnace-intake-pipe-does-not-go-outside-is-94860-.htm

enerally permissible to install a furnace using indoor air for combustion, no outside air intake. Install manuals typically show both that way and wit h an outside air intake.

t's worse. If it's in an unheated garage or basement, then it may not make much difference. For one thing, if you bring in 20f outside air, the furna ce winds up heating it too, ie you get less heat output than if it used 50f basement air.

to

The furnace doesn't have to preheat the combustion air. If you put 20F air into it versus 50F air you'll get less heat out, because the incoming air is colder and some of the combustion heat goes into raising it's temperature.
And as far as that

ns

That you're not heating the basement air much via the furnace was part of my point. The leaking air coming into the basement from outside gets heated from 20F to 50F partly by the earth surrounding the basement. But some heat is coming from upstairs, etc, it gets complicated.
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Installing the intake pipe so that it takes air from the inside of the house is not unusual and outside venting is often listed as optional in the installation instructions.
Of course, as has been stated, this means that the air intake within the house will create a vacuum and suck cold air into the house, reducing the efficiency of the furnace (though not a great deal).
If the basement where the intake pipe is located is essentially closed off from the heated part of the house, then it is effectively the same as being outside the house anyway.
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On 3 Mar 2006 14:46:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wrong junior. That would mean that a 90% eff furnace is located in an outside environment and that cant happen. Condensate water freezes in that instance and the furnace would crack parts and or shut off. Bubba
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He should not have to pay more, he paid for a job done right, He should Stop payment till it is done right.
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