Heat pump in basement?



Another way of looking at this might be to figure out how many tons or BTUS those heat pumps would be. I don't know heat pump ratings, but they are going to have to be in the range to heat a house. So for those 4 small condos in DC, let's say the total capacity needed is 100,000 BTUs. A typical window AC unit is 6,000. So, when you're using the heat pump to heat the house, it's like having 17 window AC units pumping cold air into the basement. It doesn't sound like it would take very long for that to drop the temperature way down. And the lower the temp, the less efficient the heat pump is, the less heat you get out, etc. In the summer, you would have the reverse, with the equivalent of 17 window AC units pumping their heat into the basement.
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No, but I'll see if I can find out and post back. Some of the wells are supply and the others are return and which is which depends upon the water temperature as well as what mode the heat pump is in (heat or cool).
Tomsic
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On 10/25/2012 6:15 PM, .-. wrote:

In the wells we use, the loop is one continuous circuit. There is no supply and return, each well has two pipes that are connected at the bottom of the well. When the pumps are running the water goes down one pipe and up the other to the next well. The HVAC units are either extracting the heat or the cool from the loop based on the thermostat requirements. If the well field is properly sized the circuit sheds heat into the well field strata during the summer or heats the loop in the winter. The idea is to provide close to a constant temperature in the loop that is much closer to the desired room temperature than the delta using outside air. It takes a lot more Btu's to heat a room using the outside air at 0* than to work with a 55* loop.
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I have basement with over 13,000 square feet w/ 9 feet to upper floor. When temperature is 0 F outside basement is in low 30's. Water temperature is in low 40's. I am wondering if there is enough heat in basement floor & walls to heat 1,000 square feet on upper floor with heat pump.
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On Monday, June 4, 2018 at 3:12:56 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@outlook.com wrote:

If you're proposing to try to extract heat from the basement and use it upstairs when the basement is in the low 30s, it's probably not going to work. The system won't have to run very long before the basement air temp drops, you're turning it into a freezer. And the lower it goes, the less efficient a heat pump is. That is unless the basement is much larger than the 1000 sq ft. What other choices are there for heat?
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On Monday, June 4, 2018 at 5:40:58 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

snip

OP, you say your upper level is 1,000 sq feet and the basement is 13,000 sq feet?
Is that a typo?
If it really is a 13:1 ratio, it might work.
m
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