Master Flow attic fan thermostat electrical question

The last owners of our house installed a Master Flow attic fan, but the thermostat was so deep into the adjacent rafters (and underneath is the ceiling of the attic which was put in after). In other words, we had no access to the controls, and in the summer, unlike what the owners said, the fan never turned on.
I reached up and over and then down from the hole leading up to the fan, following the cord down, and felt the box. Then, I felt something else...ouch! I little current, confirming the electricity was running. Recently, a handyman cut a hole by the thermostat, and put in an access box. Now we can see it. Well, the Master Flow thermostat looks quite old, the dial is very much in recessed in the box (you can turn it with a flat screwdriver, and the wires going into the box are partly exposed, meaning you can see the colors of the wires (not the metal wire themselves) coming out of a main shaft before entering the box.
Should I just wait for the summer and try to adjust the thermostat, or should I have this replaced, does it sound dangerous, and how will I ever know in winter if the fan actually works?
Reply to
Anonymous
The attic fan is used to circulate air in the summer to remove some of the heat in the attic. In order to adjust the thermostat you will need to wait until the attic temperature is above the point you want it to be. You can adjust the thermostat with a flathead screwdriver, however, I would suggest you replace it and relocate it to a position that is more accesible. If you got a shock from touching the wires you more than likely have a loose connection causing exposed wire. This could lead to an overheating situitation in the connection and potential fire hazzard. It needs to be checked by an electrician asap. The cost of the check and repairs far outweigh the risk of a fire destroying you home.
Reply to
stanhvac1

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