Wiring question

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Thats what I did. 10-3, 30A for my 220 TS and 12-3, 20A for my 220 DC. I then added a few 110 convienience outlets to the DC circuit. I only worry a bit about tripping my breaker if I move my compressor from its dedicated 110v 20A circuit, for convienience sake ;) , to one of the outlets on my DC circuit. If the compressor kicks in while DC is on..... has happened once but never tripped the breaker yet! I'm sure if both were starting at same time that sucker would blow pretty quick.
-B

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Breakers tend to be heat-based, so a short pulse of over-current is usually acceptable. The purpose of breakers is to protect the wiring up to the outlet, not to protect the device plugged into it, so they try to simulate how much heat the wiring is generating and shut off the current before the wire's insulation breaks down.
The only time I've seen a breaker blow "pretty quick" was when it was completely shorted.
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wrote:

Accidentally starting my chop-saw while the blade lock was engaged tripped the breaker PDQ...
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Breakers are designed with various trip delay curves to suit the intended application. There's a good overview at http://tinyurl.com/cffxx . Looking at the curve in Fig 1 of that article, that particular breaker described looks like it trips in about 20 seconds for a 2x overload, about 4 seconds for a 5x overload, and above a 10x overload, the trip time is down in the mili-second range.
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Rather than risk a short-circuit between brain and fingers, I'll give a URL. http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/hsehld.html
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That's an excellent diagram. Thanks for posting the link.
Bob
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Pedantic mistakes in that picture:
* The two mains in the breaker box aren't wired that way. They zig-zag back and forth so that vertically adjacent breakers are always on separate mains.
* 24v circuits are always wired with a single ganged breaker that uses two vertically adjacent slots; it is wrong to wire one 240v outlet to two separate breakers.
* It is wrong to tie both ground and neutral to the same tie block on the breaker panel, even when the two blocks are tied together in the panel.
* The three-hole 240v outlet should have the third hole tied to ground, not neutral. Only four-hole 240v outlets use neutral.
* The circuit is grounded at two places (the transformer and the neutral tie block). Only one ground tie-in is permitted per building. The circuit should be grounded at a *ground* tie block, with neutral tied to ground at one point (usually the main breaker box).
* The transformer is labelled "120V RMS" on the primary side, which is wrong (the primary is usually 7200v or more), and the US standard is 240V not 120V. (The US, unlike Europe, provides a center tap for lower voltage devices, but the main voltage is the same).
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writes:

Worse than nitpicking, actually. What makes you think that, for instance, the mere proximity of the "120V rms" to the primary means it references the primary? It's a case of space, and has no pointer.
It's not meant to instruct you how to wire, they refer you to the NEC for that.
Now go have a nice warm milk to counteract that nervous caffeine energy.
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He did say pedantic, and although I can understand that the drawing takes liberties for the sake of readability (like not having bus slots zig-zag) putting a neutral connection on that 240V outlet is just wrong.
-Steve
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I did say "pedantic".

Er, a degree in electrical and computer engineering? I mean, *I* know it refers to the secondary (which is 240v) but standards for such drawings make it seem to refer to the primary.

I was hoping to make sure everyone else understood that. You never know when someone's going to trust a picture and end up getting hurt.
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writes:

====>I would still like to know if the cat in the black box is alive or dead? *TIC*
Erwin
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"Yes"
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Leif Thorvaldson (in snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com) said:
| ====>I would still like to know if the cat in the black box is | alive or dead? *TIC*
"No"
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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"Leif Thorvaldson" wrote: I would still like to know if the cat in the black box is alive or dead? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Unless you know of a third possibility.
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This is what the blink tag is for:
<html> <body> <p>Schroedinger's cat is <blink>not</blink> dead!</p></body> </html>
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Leif Thorvaldson wrote:

After a 220 volt hit, I'd say that Mr. Shroedenger (sp?) won't need to stock up on the Friskie's any time soon! ;-)
...Kevin
--
Kevin Miller
http://www.alaska.net/~atftb
  Click to see the full signature.
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