What is it? CCX

Just posted set number 210:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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Good set, Rob. Which means I've got almost nothing! The only one I'll take a stab at is 1172 which I think is a pocket hand warmer. Or maybe the world's smallest bread maker. ;)
R
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1169 Disc or Frisbee Golf Basket 1170 handline hook, used in linework to send stuff up and down a pole
Don
R.H. wrote:

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1172 is an old pocket lighter. Cotton soaked in fluid on one side, flint and striker on the other.
Stubb
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1169- used to clean chimneys?
-Carl
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The future isn't what it used to be.



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Interesting and baffling, as usual.
1167 -- Very strange looking. This obviously isn't sturdy enough to apply a lot of torque or force to something, so it's probably a holder rather than a tool for operating other things. At first glance, this would seem to hold a lens or other optical component, but why then the cutouts at the sides? Why no locks to hold the width setting? For lack of a better guess, I'll say it might be used to hold cutouts under a photo enlarger for vignetting images.
1168 -- Likewise very strange. Are the glittery bits free to move about in a tube, or merely surface decoration? If free to move, it may be a vibration detecting gizmo, where patterns in the glitter indicate various sorts of vibration, at frequencies determined by the resonance of the rabbit ears. If not free to move, I guess it could be a dousing rod, used to separate water or oil from rock and gullible persons from their money.
1169 -- It's a bunch of chains hanging from a pole, for use when you need a bunch of chains hanging around a pole. Erm...possibly the center to support a canvas roof over a carousel?
1170 -- Given that this obviously has a 300 pound load capacity, and the A. B. Chance company (according to their website) manufactures various foundation anchors, I suspect this is an anchor either to attach a cable to a load or to embed in e.g. concrete and support stuff once the concrete sets.
1171 -- This looks somewhat homemade to me, probably used with a suitable follower to impart rotary motion to something, similarly to a Yankee screwdriver or those stationary-base tops with plungers to spin them. Popular mechanics shop notes (1926, page 21) had a very vaguely similar setup described for winding watches, but quite different in details.
1172 -- This appears to be a torch of some sort, possibly fueled by acetylene generated from carbide in the larger canister (with the wadding soaked in water). Equally possibly, the fuel could be some other hydrocarbon like alcohol or kerosene.
Now to read other guesses...
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wrote:

Wrong AB Chance, or at least the wrong division. This item is used in the service of transmission and distribution systems. It's called a hand line hook. The hand line goes through the holes and items are raised/lowered to the pole. It's on page 1253 of http://www.hubbellpowersystems.com/powertest/view/download.asp?pubIDh . I used to work as a design engineer in the transmission and distribution industry (for a manufacturer) and have visited the AB Chance factory in Centralia, MO, before it was sold to Hubbell Power Systems.
todd
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    O.K. Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as usual.
1167)    Hmm ... interesting device. What it sort of looks like is a     holder for heat treating material to blue it -- such as what is     done to make old clock hands. (The heat is suggested by the     wooden handle on a skinny stem.) But -- I don't see any signs     of discoloration of the brass from the heat treating.
1168)    The glass tube with two metal end caps and what looks like     brass filings in it reminds me of an early detector used for     radio reception called a "coherer". It had to be vibrated to     release the coherence, and those flexible vanes could well be     used for that purpose -- assuming that it is mounted by the     metal rod on the other end, and that there are provisions for     connecting a flexible wire to the end with the vanes.
1169)    This one sort of reminds me of a "hole" for Frisbee golf,     though it has more chains than the ones which I've seen. And,     since the bottom of the image is cut off, I can't tell whether     there is anything to retain the Frisbee once a "hole" is scored.
1170)    Looks like some kind of load-bearing hook which can be dumped     once the load is slacked. The hoisting chain or line is     connected to the larger hole, and the dumping line to the     smaller one. The markings suggest load-bearing, too.
1171)    This one seems to be a "damnifiknow". If the wire wound     around it were square or rectangular in cross section, I would     consider that it is for cleaning a hole in something. But as it     is, I can think of no reasonable function for the thing. :-)
1172)    A pocket hand warmer, perhaps? It looks as though it take fuel     like cigarette lighter fluid in the cotton, and the other     (smaller) cylinder holds the burner -- though I'm not sure what     the source of oxygen would be in a pocket. It almost certainly     would have a non-flamable insulation around it -- perhaps     asbestos cloth, given the apparent age.
    Now to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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