Well, off to the auction

We're off to the annual two day Amish auction in Rich Hill, MO tomorrow and Saturday. I hope to score another 512 board feet of 4 to 8 inch wide red oak, 8 feet long, for 85 cents a BF like i did two years ago.
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Steve Barker
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On 4/19/2012 8:11 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

Good luck with that!
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On 4/19/2012 8:11 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

well, no lumber this year. But i did eyeball a model 55 and several model 45 stanley planes. Fixin' to look them up to see what they're worth.
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On 4/20/2012 7:08 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

What they're worth is really a function of how complete they are and how many cutters are included. If it's in good condition with all the parts and accessories and a full array of cutters, it can bring upwards of $300 on eBay; more if it's in the original box. No-so-complete models might only bring $50 or less.
If you really want to learn about planes, there's no better place to start than Patrick Leach's "Blood and Gore" web page:
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0.htm
He has excellent explanations of the 45 and 55 models, along with all the parts you should expect to see on a complete plane. It's an excellent resource to print off and take with you to the auction to see if those planes are worth purchasing and re-selling. And if you read very far at all into what Patrick says about them, re-selling them is the ONLY thing you're going to want to do. I've never owned either of these planes, but a friend of mine has one, and I've seen enough of them to know that what Patrick says is the truth: I would only use one "like if a gun was stuck to my head, or something like that". :-)
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On 4/20/2012 9:33 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

thanks for the reply. Although i fell asleep early friday and didn't see it (your reply) until after the auction on sat. The #55 went for $135 and the high bidder didn't show any sign of letting it go. I should have bumped him a bit, but i didn't want to get stuck with it. It was not complete as far as the cutters were concerned, so i knew it's value was way reduced. I was actually working as a ticket runner for the auction company and missed the #45's, so i have no idea what they went for. After the short research i did on friday night and the link you sent, i know now that it will be purely ornamental if i ever have a chance to buy one again. LOL!!
steve
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On 4/20/2012 9:33 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

Forgot to mention. I did get a real nice #7 Stanley for $30. I have a feeling this one will actually get used.
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On 4/22/2012 3:40 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

Ah good, the No. 7 is definitely a useful beast. I was just using mine today to edge joint some long 1" thick rough-sawn hickory boards for gluing up into wider boards (making some shelves for the weef). Mind you, I'm not trying to use the hand plane to achieve a perfectly straight and true surface for gluing boards together (I don't have THAT much patience!), only to get them "close" for the final pass (or two, or three) through the power jointer. You'd be surprised how much quicker it can be to knock down the high spots with a hand plane prior to running a board through the power jointer or planer; I might have huffed that damn board through the power jointer 12 to 15 times before getting it straight enough to glue up. A No. 5 jack plane is also very useful for this type of work.
Something else I like to do after truing up a board in this fashion is to make a final pass or two over the power-jointed edge with a No. 3 (or a 5-1/4; same width, 3-1/2" longer) that has a RAZOR sharp edge and taking a VERY light cut. This removes all the milling marks left by the power jointer and leaves a glassy smooth finish that gives you the absolute best surface for edge gluing. Two boards edge-jointed in this fashion will glue together with a seam so tight you'll never see it unless you inspect really closely.
Any idea what vintage your No. 7 is? This page http://www.tooltrip.com/tooltrip9/stanley/stan-bpl/bailey-types.htm is an excellent resource for determining the approximate year of manufacture.
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On 4/22/2012 3:40 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

Ah good, the No. 7 is definitely a useful beast. I was just using mine today to edge joint some long 1" thick rough-sawn hickory boards for gluing up into wider boards (making some shelves for the weef). Mind you, I'm not trying to use the hand plane to achieve a perfectly straight and true surface for gluing boards together (I don't have THAT much patience!), only to get them "close" for the final pass (or two, or three) through the power jointer. You'd be surprised how much quicker it can be to knock down the high spots with a hand plane prior to running a board through the power jointer or planer; I might have huffed that damn board through the power jointer 12 to 15 times before getting it straight enough to glue up. A No. 5 jack plane is also very useful for this type of work.
Something else I like to do after truing up a board in this fashion is to make a final pass or two over the power-jointed edge with a No. 3 (or a 5-1/4; same width, 3-1/2" longer) that has a RAZOR sharp edge and taking a VERY light cut. This removes all the milling marks left by the power jointer and leaves a glassy smooth finish that gives you the absolute best surface for edge gluing. Two boards edge-jointed in this fashion will glue together with a seam so tight you'll never see it unless you inspect really closely.
Any idea what vintage your No. 7 is? This page http://www.tooltrip.com/tooltrip9/stanley/stan-bpl/bailey-types.htm is an excellent resource for determining the approximate year of manufacture.
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On 4/22/2012 10:29 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

Well, using that info and this one http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticles/pdatechart.pdf i have determined i have a hybird. The bed is pre 1899 and the "works" above the frog are 1899-1902.
Now, is there a link that tells me how to adjust that iron and the piece on top of it? I believe it's called a 'cap iron'.
thanks
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