weather proof base

I have made a piece of garden art from a length of tree branch (gumtree) about 8" (200mm)wide and 12"(300mm)tall. I want to stand it up in the flower bed of the garden. To hold it in place I was going to drill a hole up the centre of the bottom and place it over a steel rod stuck in the ground. What nifty suggestions have you for weather proofing or rot proofing the base where it touches the ground?. I don't want to use any chemicals. The top will have a roof-like protection. Thanks, davy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm interested in seeing what other say about it, but one thing I've been told is that water likes to leach right up the branch fibers, so I'd try very hard to to seal off that bottom end. Including the drilled hole. Do you consider paint or something similar to be a chemical in that context?
I figure you know it can't last forever but you might be interested in the story of this carving. After 16 years of repairing rot, they're probably going to give up and cast it in metal. It's a beautiful piece and we're grateful we were around during it's first incarnation. http://www.harrywhitehorse.com/effigytree/index.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan wrote:

Its sort of a little house that I want the kids to play with. I don't want to douse it in some highly toxic solution that will make the piece last forever but kill the kids. davy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Maybe spreading a coat of epoxy over the bottom of it would seal it against ground contact CC

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
davy wrote:

I know you requested no chemicals but where's the fun in that?
One possibility that might pass as acceptable is to soak the butt end in borax solution, harmless to people and animals but deadly to insects and fungus.
Dissolve all the 40 mule team borax that will go into solution in a couple of gallons of water and set the butt in a five gallon bucket with the solution and let soak for several weeks.
That would probably gain you a few extra years.
basilisk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

fyi: the hotter the water, the more borax you can dissolve in water.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use chemicals, don't let it touch the ground, or embrace rot as part of the art.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Would you consider AnchorSeal a chemical? I assume it is mostly wax. Does anyone know if it would hold up for this application?
SteveP.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not about what *I* would consider a chemical...
I suspect the answer is "How long do you want it to hold up for?"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Balderstone wrote:

I have read that here in the Northwest, the tribes on the coast considered their totem poles to be transitory. Rotting was a part of the art, so to speak.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Feb 2009 19:19:36 -0600, Dave Balderstone

...emphasize "...don't let it touch the ground!" Hold it up a couple of inches...get yourself a couple of tubes of silicone and apply liberally to the end grain...let it dry and do it again...be ready to re-apply whatever finish is on the upper portion at intervals, hopefully before it gets damaged by sun and water. Bugs need entry points, make sure they are filled and no bugs...easier said than done.
cg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

After further reflection, perhaps a ring of cedar or redwood would accomplish the goal?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Balderstone wrote:

After reading the last couple of contributions I went to the local gardening shop and bought a terracotta pot saucer about the right diameter and have since turned it upside down and siliconed my work of art on to it. It works really well! The colour blends in and the flange of the saucer looks like a little pedestal and most importantly, it keeps the wood about an inch above the ground. So thanks for all your thoughts on this subject which lead me to a very satisfying result. cheers, davy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
davy wrote:

Dip it in molten wax.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Make sure the wood does not touch the ground.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.