using wood filler correctly: no popping out


I've got about (150) #8 screws with their heads recessed average .220 " below the surface of mdf door jambs. These holes, to fill, are 5/16" diameter. The majority of the screws are driven in tightly to the rough in behind. There are some screws though that are backed off; the top jambs. I have only recently learned these rabbet and dado joined jambs should be completely free floating.
Oh well. I don't like filling things in the first place. No I have extra holes facing downward with little space between the nice shinny heads and the surface of the mdf. Maybe half of the others'.
With the screws in the side jambs tight I know to do what I think you should always do. Try to force the filler into the back. Probably have to wait to dry. Then sand. Repeat.
Then I have four windows' casings to fill the nail holes. These are either set tiny Arrow electric stapler brads or set ~1-1/2" spiral finish nails.
I'm gonna give these four doors and four windows the deluxe 3 coat oil prime and paint finish and I'd like to know how to prevent work in the future from popping out.
Questions: What about where the nails in the top jamb are not bottomed, but "floating". The screws and the jambs aren't fixed in relation to one another. Can I use the gap to my advantage. Can I just give the filler a skim coat: Wait to dry. Then sand. Repeat? i.e.. not try to bottom? Don't want them popping out in the future.
I'll probably buy an Elmers Wood Filler tub, likely the product at the local HD. Should this be a good product for all of the above .
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I'd use Bondo in this case...
Bob S.

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BobS wrote:

Bondo is a very underrated wood filler for painted work.
I've used it many times with excellent success, on everything from trim to cabinetry to large model aircraft.
Cheap, easy to obtain, and excellent performing!
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Not to mention it's workability... I was making a fairly complex window molding (wide, long and hefty) for my SIL kitchen renovation and I messed up towards the end of a piece. It was made from ash and was hanging over the edge of my router table and you know what happens when a router bit spinning at 12K rpm can do to a piece of wood when it decides to climb... I filled in the "enhancement" with Bondo and after it setup, I ran the piece back thru the router - hanging on very tightly this time, and the curves in the Bondo section were super smooth.
As you said - it is a great filler for painted work or if you're using a finish where the wood grain does not show through and you're using a color that will hide the pink color of the Bondo. There are other colors available I'm told but I have a large can of the pink stuff and that has worked well for me. A small tip to remember. Use less hardener (up to 50%) to extend the open time and then double the time to cure before you work it.
Bob S.

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Terry Masaschi of FWW is also a big fan. Look for an article from her in the next month or two on finishing tips. Bondo will be in there.
JP
BobS wrote:

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