uneven boards.

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then finishing up with the grain, flatness is quite easy to achieve. DON'T use a scrub plane. They are to short and dig very good holes. You need something long. #6 or #7 would be good. If you have never done something like this before, now's not the time. Find the shop with the wide belt sander.
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skill in my hands to guide them.
Location is everything. Your trees are not our N American trees. Just hacked up a NASTY hard maple about 15 inches in diameter 8 feet long for bowl blanks. Had he been a sawlog, he'd have been worth money, but what is too full of embedded bark around branches will go up the chimney winter after next. Hard maple goes for about a buck a board foot in selects up here. This log was about six bucks as firewood.
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You could check around your area for cabinet shops that would run the top through their wide belt sander for a (usually reasonable) fee. I'm not sure, but I believe Woodcraft stores may be able to help also.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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If this is a one time project I like the time saver anwser. If you are are interested in working wood which I assume you do than I would suggest to learn to fix your mistakes which as stated before proably were due to not face jointing.The anwsers above that I like is to either cut and re glue or buy a used # 6 or 7 plane, and make some winding sticks. I purchased one on e-bay, flattened it on glass and put a hock blade in it and use it often. Take some swipes on the back side to learn. The pencil mark idea is a good one as well. Remember what ever method you use will yeild a thickness which is less than you had planned and depends on how off you were. If you started over would you have use for the old top?
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Thanks all for your answers. I appreciate them all.
A couple of people have suggested that the cause of my problem is that I didn't face joint the boards. I did face joint them, the problem is not that there are gaps in the joint but that one board is higher on one side and obviously lower on the other.
I can't start over for a couple of reasons beyond that the original purchase almost required me to discuss the project with my bank manager. Resawing the boards apart would leave either the top too narrow or require another board.
I called around and my board is now 20mm wider than the 400 maximum possible on the few places that will sand this for me and anyway Dave (Teamcasa) struck a nerve when he suggested that if others do it I might not be able to say I built it myself. The 'router carrier' that he suggests sounds like the jig I made a while ago without knowing what I was making. Reinventing the wheel I suppose.
There are no Woodcraft stores in Brisbane Australia.
I googled for winding stick pictures but found nothing.
I'll post pics in alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking and on my site, so the curious can see what happend next!
Thanks again
Mekkon
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Winding sticks are easy to make and many past magazine issues have articles.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pS276&cat=1,41182
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

I thought that was one of the possibilities, having had similar problems with bisquit jointing when I started out with that technology.
The best remedy for that, in my opinion, is a very sharp finishing plane, at 45 degrees or even 90 degrees across the grain to get rid of the step (run plane towards the high step so's not to get tear-out), then a cabinet scraper or maybe a random orbital sander to clean up.
-Peter
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Ah yes. Some swear by biscuit joiners, I swear at them. biscuits add little or no strength to a joined top. If your equipment/technique is good enough so that you can use biscuits to aid alignment, then go for it. Mine isn't.
I don't have any difficulty aligning glue-ups by hand. What I don't do is any more than 2 seams in a clamp-up, usually only one.
Next time, try aligning the boards manually. If the seams are well-jointed (that is, you do not have to ben the wood to close the joint), I find that I can glue the next seam in 15 or 20 minutes.
Cheers,
Steve
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