Twist and Bend?


Every time I start a project I am always concerned that my lumber (post jointing and planing) will twist and bend before I can construct the carcass. For my current project I am stacking my lumber with sticks in between to allow for even moisture equilibration.
Should this be a 'real' concern? Or am I being overly cautious now?
--
Stoutman
http://home.triad.rr.com/brianmelissa/woodworking_frames.htm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually the process begins with timber selection. It is considered to be good practice to select out the most stable stock (ie: as near to quartersawn as possible) for the door frames and such. It is usually considered to be best to do the stock prep and joinery for these items on the same day, as the reference planes can become out of spec quickly and the joinery needs to be cut before any relaxation can occur. A secondary consideration would be the selection and preparation of any exposed members such as casing and pilasters. If your carcase is to be of solid stock it would be best to joint and glue the panels on the same day, for the above reason. The stickering of stock should occur during the stage that the timber is in a rough state. You will do yourself a great favor if you bring the timber to final dimensions and create the joinery on the same day, whenever possible. If you do not do this, you run the risk of your reference edges becoming out of square to each other and your joinery will be the worse for it. The concern for Equilibrium Moisture Content is most perfectly put at the rough timber stage. If you remove more or less equivalent mass from the opposing faces during prep, you will not have to worry about distortion from unequal moisture content throughout the section.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Are you concerned because of a bad experience? Sure, it's a real concern, and no, you're not being overly cautious, especially if you live in a humid environment. Stickers are part of it, of course. Use a two-step process of machining. Acclimate the wood to it's final resting place, rough dimension, allow to acclimate and move again (as long as possible), then final jointing/planing/assembly/finishing (as quickly as possible). I think. Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree with the above replies. Also, if you get lumber from a mill (I have my own logs milled) try to keep all boards, from the same log, together and keep the boards adjacent to one another, as they are sawn. Before milling, try to mark the ends of the logs so that you can tell, after cutting and if the boards get separated, how they were positioned within the log...Does that make sense? It's best to have similar boards complement one another, within a woodworking project.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All experienced woodworkers are well aware of the "living aspect" of lumber. It moves, twists and bends. It is best to true up your lumber and cut to size shortly (at most a day or two) before assembly. There are many factors that can effect cup, wane, and warp.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This answers another question I had. A couple of days after getting it home, I noticed that some of the cherry I bought earlier this week was slightly bowed. I wasn't sure what happened.
After reading this thread, it seems that you guys are saying that this is going to happen, and it's just part of working with wood. Is that correct?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ukalu wrote: >This answers another question I had. A couple of days after getting it

Yep, it's part of it. Certain woods are well-behaved, others are not. And it depends on a few other things, such as where from the tree the wood was cut, changes in temp/humidity, storage methods, etc.. Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup. Accept that it will happen; mitigate the problem by choosing stock well an using good techniques; design to accomodate movement.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20 Jan 2006 06:55:07 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How did you buy it ? I'd expect it to move after cutting or long drying, but rapid movement of unworked timber is indicative of timber that wasn't quite as dry as you might want it. If you brought it from a damp winter timberyard into a warm, dry house then I'd expect it to move, but not if you left it in a draughty workshop.
Which way did it go ? Did the rings straighten out (getting drier) or did the rings curve more (getting wetter) ? If you really want this cherry to give you the results that cherry is worthy of, let it sit for a few months in the sort of humidity it'll finally be stored in. Better have it move now than after you've made the cabinet.
Couple of things you might like to look at:
A couple of cheap (<$5) plastic air hygrometers. Put one in the workshop and one in the living room. Keep a vague eye on them around the year.
Bruce Hoadley's excellent book "Understanding Wood". If you want to be a _good_ woodworker, you have to get a little grip around this stuff.
The US forest products lab handbook. This is available for free as PDFs on the web, or you can buy an affordable paper copy from Lee Valley etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to all that responded.
My only problem with some of the responses is that I cant always (actually never) assemble a day or two after milling. I woodwork after work in the evenings a few hours at a time and then on weekends. It is sometimes (ok, always) necessary for me to leave stock for several days after milling before assembly. So far I have only 'noticed' a problem once, where a board cupped slightly and needed to be re-face-jointed.
I cant be alone here.?. Is everyone assembling a day or two after milling??
--
Stoutman
http://home.triad.rr.com/brianmelissa/woodworking_frames.htm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Copied from an exceptionally well written prior post:
It is usually considered to be best to do the stock prep and joinery for these items on the same day, as the reference planes can become out of spec quickly and *****the joinery needs to be cut***** before any relaxation can occur.
Being a bit anal here but it's cutting the joinery here that is most critical, not assembly.
I think there is a subtle but important distinction.
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I can possibly avoid it, I would never intentionally make major cuts on timber then carry on working with it immediately. Leave it a week after you resaw it before thicknessing. Leave it a week after thicknessing before you do the joinery. I've usually had the raw boards in my own racks for a few months before I work it anyway.
For assembly, then I'd prefer to assemble as soon as possible after cutting joints, but I really wouldn't sweat it. The timber should be more stable by this point.
This is probably why I have a great many projects on the go simultaneously and never get to finish anything!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I do not plane both surfaces in equal amounts my boards will some times cup. Ripped rails and stiles will often bow If I do not use them within 24 hours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting post and responses. Just to throw my two cents into the discussion....
I've never gone with the approach to hurry and 'get er dun' before the wood starts to move. What's to stop the wood from moving after it's assembled? I normally mill my stock down and leave it oversized in thickness and width. I let the stock sit on edge with no stickering or stacking for a few days and let it move were ever it wants. Then I joint two adjoining surfaces square and plane the stock to it's final dimension. If the stock moved too much to use this method, I really don't want to use it anyway as it would be the piece that racks the project. For interior door stile and rails, I will oversize the glued up stock by 5/16" and let it sit without pressure for a month or more. I would rather have the wood move before I machine it rather than after.
Just another method to consider.
Tom Plamann
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Tom Plamann" wrote in message

My druthers also. I've got wood destined for a set of chairs that has been sitting in the shop for 3 months ... the longer it sits, the more I know what to expect from it.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As usually Tom, the correct answer. Thinking back on what I said about my wood moving when doing rails and stiles on interior doors, I had actually forgotten why I try to assemble the doors quickly after cutting. I indicated that the wood would bow after cutting. Actually after thinking about it I seldom have a piece bow. The actual problem that I have is when I cut the groves in the rails and stiles for the plywood panels to fit into. In humid Houston if I do not assemble the same day I often have to taper the edges of the panels with a sander so that they will again fit into the slots in the rails and stiles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.