Turning Fresh Stock

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On 9/11/2015 6:52 PM, Meanie wrote:

Silver Maple is perfect for lathe, chisel and file tool handles. Walnut is better saved for other things, like cutting boards, small boxes, trim inlays and that sort of stuff. Not that it wouldn't make good handles, just it's a little special for a utilitarian handle. I made my daughter a nice wedding goblet with the captured rings out of a "firewood" black walnut log. I like mixing maple, cherry and walnut in cutting boards. Gives them a nice traditional look.
When taping the ends of your blanks, remember it takes about a year per inch to dry wood, maybe less if cut in the fall, early winter. I have a box full of wood blanks of all sizes I keep. Some pieces are 40 years old. I would guess most anyone with a lathe has the same box:-). If you ever go to a woodworkers store like Rockler and price little turning blocks, you will instantly know why a nice looking hunk of firewood is worth saving.
Turning bowls, lamps, is most fun with green wood, the greener the better. Lot's of techniques posted on here for drying. I used to melt paraffin wax all over the rough turning and that worked. I'd try the paper bag thing I think. If you get checks, even big ones, you can mix epoxy and saw dust, or a variety of things and sometimes get result better than if they weren't there.
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On Saturday, September 12, 2015 at 8:30:33 AM UTC-5, Jack wrote:

You can also build one of these bad boys. Your drying time will be cut down from months to weeks. That's my plan for the fall and I'm sticking to it.
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/WoodDrying/wood_kiln.htm
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On 9/12/2015 9:34 AM, Michael wrote:

Yes, looked like a nice design. I looked at the pdf here:
http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/420/420-030/420-030_pdf.pdf
Looks like it would work well and be a simple build.
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On 2015-09-11 22:52:02 +0000, Meanie said:

turning branches can be troublesome. Not just from the pith, but from the wood tension.
The wood on the "top" of a branch is under tension, while the wood on the "bottom" of the branch is under compression. This results in extra stress on the wood, when you turn the wood this release of tension can result in the wood moving in odd ways
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On 9/12/2015 10:25 AM, Ralph E Lindberg wrote:

Excellent point.
I generally stayed away from branches because they're always smaller than the trunk, and knew the pith was not good, so not a lot left after splitting out the pith and sap wood. Never really thought about this end of it, good to know, thanks.
As far as cutting wood in the fall when the tree has less moisture, it appears I was probably wrong about this. My personal experience is different, but there could be other things going on. Anyway, I stumbled over this that if you read the whole thing, puts egg on my face.
It's a good read on the subject:
http://tinyurl.com/ov4gnql or http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Sawing_and_Drying_Does_the_Season.html
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