Table Saw - Bosch vs. Ryobi vs. Delta vs. HF

I am looking at a few different table saws. Until recently, I was going to get the Bosch 4000-07 ($500 from amazon). A pro carpenter I know recommended it; I also have the Bosch 3915 scms, and it's great.
Then I came upon the pro-Ryobi comments in this group. Has anyone used both the Bosch and the Ryobi, and is the Bosch "$200 better" than the BT3100? ($300 at the Despot.)
For comparison, I looked at the Delta TS220 ($220) - has anyone used this?
I also visited the local HF store yesterday and took a look at the much-inquired-about $340 table saw they sell. Looks like crap. The display model's table was rusty and the fence couldn't be moved. Looked heavy, and that was about it. (It's out of the running.)
My immediate use for the TS is some basic ripping of furring strips from 2x lumber.
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As a BT3000 owner I am pro Ryobi. With both saws you will run into power issues. I have burned up a motor, but I had been ripping 2x's most of the day. The induction motor in the Ryobi is not made for 100% duty cycle. I have no idea if the Bosch is induction or not. I would classify the Bosch as a construction site saw, and the Ryobi as a fine woodworking saw. Although I have been talking to the foreman of a building remodel, and he uses the BT3000. Says that it is light enough if he is working alone, with most of the features of a contractors saw.
Anything you ever wanted to know about the BT3x00 http://www.bt3central.com/bt3k.asp

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I'm sure the Bosch makes a fine construction site saw given its portability, but it is a well made and designed tool that is more than adequate for fine woodworking. The biggest drawback of the Bosch when comparing to a contractors saw is the table size. But if you want portability or have limited space, and can live with the small table, its hard to beat the Bosch. My neighbor who does fine (finish) carpentry work for his livelihood post-retirement was so impressed by my Bosch that he bought one. I think it is now the only table saw he uses, even at home, and he loves the portability. I have both the collapsible stand which I store in the garage for when I want to use it outside, and the fixed stand for the basement. Both are very well made - the sturdiness of the collapsible stand it truly impressive although it you only plan to use it in one room I recommend the fixed stand. Mine is on mounted on the Delta Universal mobile base.
The Bosch even comes with a decent combination blade. I have used the stock blade to rip 6' by1 3/4" hard maple. I've since bought a Forrest WWII which lives on the saw except when I cut plywood (use a Freud 80 tooth laminate blade which works slightly better for this task) or MDF (I use the stock blade because it works fine and I'd rather dull it than my WWII).
Can the Ryobi pass the nickel balanced on edge test? My Bosch can pass it - even when starting up.
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Steve James wrote:

Wow. I need to put a new saw in the queue somewhere. Mine makes a nickel on the table two houses down from mine fall over when it starts up, and my cat loses one of her lives.
If I don't have the piece clamped to something, I have to start the motor, then line it up. I can't hold anything through the big jerk.
I have a Ryobi in the back of my mind, but what is this Bosch y'all are debating about?
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The Bosch 4000 Benchtop table saw. 15 amp induction motor with soft-start and torque sensing feedback that tries to maintain constant blade speed. Aluminum deck that is claimed to be the largest in its class by the manufacturer (I assume the class is benchtop saws, and I haven't checked their claim). It weighs 60 lbs. It has a good fence, useable mitre gauge (not great but better than all other bench top saws I looked at), and a good splitter and blade guard which I use. The splitter is close to the blade and raises and lowers with the blade as on European style saws. It costs about $500. Main competition a Dewalt benchtop saw at about the same price. Compared to the Dewalt, the Bosch has a better mitre guage, more table in front of the blade (still not as much as I would like), and a MUCH more stable portable stand. The Dewalt has a better fence than the Bosch, but the Bosch fence works well.
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The "good" Ryboi's -- the BT3000 and BT3100 can, with ease. At least, my BT3100 can, as can everyone else's that has reported on this test. The thing has *no* noticeable vibration. When I got my jointer, I was shocked by two things -- it's vibration, and how quiet the motor was.
--randy
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If that is all you will every do, any of the saw will do the job. What about the future? If you plan to make cabinets, bookcases, etc, then you will be better off looking for a better contractor's saw. Ed
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On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 08:17:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@epsno.com (Jedd Haas) wrote:

    Yes.
    I have not used the Ryobi table saw because all the Ryobi products I have every used failed to do the job. Ryobi is on my "do-not-buy list."
    I have found the Bosch to be accurate. It has cut everything I have given it to cut. When I cut oak, I have to slow down, but it cuts it.

    I thought about the Delta but the Bosch looked better. I have no misgivings about my choice.
         I have been making cabinets, mostly. It works very well. I sometimes wish the table was bigger, but I'm willing to accept that because of the extreme portability.
         You will not regret the extra money for the Bosch.
                    Peter
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Nor will he regret saving the $200 and buying a BT3100, as long as he has the patience to set it up properly (and that is an important IF!).
http://www.bt3central.com/ has lots of information on them.
--randy
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Had a BT3000. Used it for a year.
Then bought a Jet JTS-10, in the $400-$500 range if you look hard. I must say I am very happy with the Jet saw.
The way I see it....
BT3000 Pros: - Light - Small - No rust. The top is made from extruded aluminum
BT3000 Cons: - Non standard mitre slot. Cant use standard jigs and fixtures using the slot - Induction motor. Noise makes you and the neighbors nervous - Power isnt there. - Aluminum tabletop and fence might bend under clapsetmps - Cant use standard delta/rockwell/jet jigs, extension tables, or fences. The BT3000 doesnt follow the universal design that most saws follow.
I initially bought the BT3000 because my wife wanted me to be sure I would enjoy woodworking. I am glad I eventually replaced it with the Jet. I dont want to upset BT3000 owners. Youll have to decide for yourself.
Check out the google history in the rec. This is a frequent topic. People either love it or dont care for it.
Terry

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tbowman wrote:

Did you mean _universal_ motor?
All of my induction-motor machines are rather quiet.
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@christophermerrillZZZ.net says...

Yup, it has a universal motor. Still, the things a lot quieter than my "quiet" shop vac, and both are quieter than when the wood meets the blade.
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Sure beats a handsaw or a circular saw.
On 28 Oct 2003 22:17:56 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (tbowman) wrote:

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